platform

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platform

1. a raised floor or other horizontal surface, such as a stage for speakers
2. a raised area at a railway station, from which passengers have access to the trains
3. the declared principles, aims, etc., of a political party, an organization, or an individual
4. a level raised area of ground
5. a specific type of computer hardware or computer operating system

Platform

A raised floor or terrace, open or roofed; a stair landing.

Platform

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

“The Platform” is where mediums address the public and relay messages received from spirit. The Morris Pratt Institute Educational Course in Modern Spiritualism states,

Platform decorum is of the utmost importance. The moment you step into view, you are Spiritualism. You may be the main reason many of the people came. To meet the various needs of those attending, to leave a permanent message in their mind, and to be an asset to the movement of Spiritualism, you must know and practice good platform decorum. Our services are religious services, and those serving should act accordingly.

Whether or not there is an actual platform is immaterial. For example, at Lily Dale Assembly there are regular daily message services given throughout the summer season at Forest Temple and at Inspiration Stump. A variety of different mediums speak at each service. There is no actual platform from which they speak—they stand in front of the seated people—yet the traditional “platform decorum” still is strictly followed.

Speaking from a platform offers advantages to the medium in that she can see the whole of the audience and can thereby more easily distinguish the different people who are being contacted by spirit.

Sources:

Morris Pratt Institute: Educational Course on Modern Spiritualism. Milwaukee: M.P.I., 1981

Platform

 

in geology, a segment of the earth’s crust, within a central continental craton, in which the folded base is relatively submerged and covered by 1- to 16-km strata of horizontally bedded or gently tilted sedimentary rocks. The platform is contrasted to the relatively uplifted structure of the central continental craton “known as the shield and is composed of diverse structures of lesser orders, such as anteclises, syneclises, and domes. The term was proposed by E. Suess in 1885.

platform

[′plat‚fȯrm]
(computer science)
The hardware system and the system software used by a computer program.
(geology)
Any level or almost level surface; a small plateau.
A continental area covered by relatively flat or gently tilted, mainly sedimentary strata which overlay a basement of rocks consolidated during earlier deformations; platforms and shields together constitute cratons.
(mining engineering)
A wooden floor on the side of a gangway at the bottom of an inclined seam, to which the coal runs by gravity, and from which it is shoveled into mine cars.
(ordnance)
Temporary or permanent solid bed on which artillery pieces are supported to give greater stability.
Metal stand at the base of some types of guns upon which the gun crew stands while serving the gun.

platform

1. A raised floor or terrace, open or roofed.
2. A stair landing; also See stair platform.
3. A grillage.

platform

i. A flat structure on which loads are carried and may be air-dropped. See airdrop platform or palletized bladder.
ii. A vehicle carrying sensors and/or weapons [e.g., an aircraft, UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle)].
iii. A raised operating area for operation of helicopters and VSTOL (vertical/short takeoff and landing) aircraft.
iv. An extended root of turbine blade linking the root attachment to the airfoil.

platform

Specific computer hardware, as in the phrase "platform-independent". It may also refer to a specific combination of hardware and operating system and/or compiler, as in "this program has been ported to several platforms". It is also used to refer to support software for a particular activity, as in "This program provides a platform for research into routing protocols".

platform

A hardware and/or software architecture that serves as a foundation or base. The term originally dealt with hardware and often still refers to only a CPU model or computer family. For example, the x86 PC is the world's largest desktop computer platform. The terms "platform" and "environment" are used interchangeably. See hardware platform and environment.

An Operating System Platform
An operating system often implies the CPU hardware. For example, when an application "runs on the Windows platform," it means that the program has been compiled into the x86 machine language and runs under Windows. It implies x86 because Windows runs exclusively on x86 machines, although it used to run on other hardware, and in 2017 will run on Qualcomm's ARM chips (see Windows 10 ARM).

The Mac operating system (macOS) means Intel x86 hardware, although in the past, it ran on PowerPC and Motorola 68000 CPUs. The Android platform means Android OS and ARM CPUs, while Apple's mobile platform runs the iOS operating system on ARM (see ARM chips).

With Unix, hardware is not implied. Unix applications run on almost every CPU family and are compiled into the machine language of that hardware. The phrase "the xyz app runs on Unix" implies multiple CPUs. See Unix.

Platforms Provide Interfaces
An application can also be a platform if it is a base for other programs. For example, Web browsers accept third-party plug-ins, and the browser application becomes a platform to interface with. Any software can be said to be a platform that provides a set of rules and codes that applications are written to interact with. See application framework and online platform.
References in classic literature ?
She carries an obsolete "barbette" conning tower--a six-foot affair with railed platform forward--and our warning beam plays on the top of it as a policeman's lantern flashes on the area sneak.
The other warriors quickly followed their jeddak, leaving Thuvia and Carthoris alone upon the platform.
A the point where we first met this formation it was 120 fee in thickness; following up the river course, the surfac imperceptibly rose and the mass became thicker, so that a forty miles above the first station it was 320 feet thick What the thickness may be close to the Cordillera, I hav no means of knowing, but the platform there attains a heigh of about three thousand feet above the level of the sea we must therefore look to the mountains of that great chai for its source; and worthy of such a source are streams tha have flowed over the gently inclined bed of the sea to distance of one hundred miles.
This was no less than the appearance on his own little platform in pairs, of All Creation, on its way into his own particular ark: the elephant leading, and the fly, with a diffident sense of his size, politely bringing up the rear.
As he walked about the platform in his high-heeled boots, looking for our trunks, I saw that he was a rather slight man, quick and wiry, and light on his feet.
If the same multitude which had stood as eye-witnesses while Hester Prynne sustained her punishment could now have been summoned forth, they would have discerned no face above the platform nor hardly the outline of a human shape, in the dark grey of the midnight.
They gave notice that the abbot and his official suite would move in state and occupy the platform at 10:30, up to which time all the region which was under my ban must be clear; the bells would then cease from tolling, and this sign should be permission to the multitudes to close in and take their places.
Each in her turn stepped forward to the edge of the platform, cleared her throat, held up her manuscript
One always fears that the platform may sink under the weight of youthful platitudes uttered on such occasions; yet one can never be properly critical, because the sight of the boys and girls themselves, those young and hopeful makers of to-morrow, disarms one's scorn.
The floor of this great circular hall was thronged with chieftains, warriors and women, and at one end was a great raised platform upon which squatted the most hideous beast I had ever put my eyes upon.
I went to the central staircase which opened on to the platform, clambered up the iron steps, and found myself on the upper part of the Nautilus.
And in another minute the train drew up alongside of the platform, and a stream of passengers began to flow out from the booking office and waiting-rooms.