platinum-iridium

platinum-iridium

(standard)
A standard, against which all others of the same category are measured. Usage: silly.

The notion is that one of whatever it is has actually been cast in platinum-iridium alloy and placed in the vault beside the Standard Kilogram at the International Bureau of Weights and Measures near Paris, as the bar defining the standard metre once was.

"This garbage collection algorithm has been tested against the platinum-iridium cons cell in Paris."

Compare golden.
References in periodicals archive ?
This reference mass is used to calibrate national standards made of platinum-iridium alloy [2].
Experts are willing to make the changes so that it is no longer based on the mass of a solid cylinder of platinum-iridium alloy that sits beneath three layers of protective glass sealed in a locked vault in Sevres, France.
Where in France is the platinum-iridium cylinder which represents the standard kilogram stored in France?
Electrochemical oxidation of hydrogen peroxide on platinum and platinum-iridium electrodes in physiological buffer and its applicability to hydrogen peroxide-based biosensors.
Among global standards for length, mass, time, and other fundamental quantities, only the kilogram remains a physical object--a carefully machined cylinder of platinum-iridium alloy at the International Bureau of Weights and Measures at Sevres, France.
Superior gold-tip catheter outperforms platinum-iridium tips - maximum voltage-guided technique is optimal versus conventional ablation
Since a small molecule requires a comparably small sensor, the team used a platinum-iridium electrode with a diameter of only 15 nanometers to measure the current.
Since 1889, a single platinum-iridium bar has lain sealed in an airtight bell jar in the International Bureau of Weights and Measures in Sevres, France.
The Aescula(TM) 1055K left-heart lead is a stylet-driven silicone insulated lead with a titanium nitride (TiN) coated platinum-iridium electrode.
These improved mass measurements may also contribute to an ongoing effort to produce an atomic standard for mass, replacing the platinum-iridium cylinder currently representing a kilogram (SN: 4/24/93, p.
It uses a titanium nitride (TiN) coated platinum-iridium electrode and steroid-eluting collar designed for optimum threshold performance.
Careful recalibration against the so-called international prototype of the kilogram -- a lump of platinum-iridium alloy that sits in a vault at the International Bureau of Weights and Measures in Sevres, France -- showed the U.