playgoer


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playgoer

a person who goes to theatre performances, esp frequently
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She remains a reactive playgoer despite the performance framing the playgoing experience as being unable to produce a reaction.
As to the motive behind providing a playgoer with such an aid, "Those authors who put themselves to the expense of supplying Arguments were choosing through the medium of the printed page to become their own presenters and maintain a highly personal interpretative presence throughout performance" (80), as when Jonson provided an argument for Neptune's Triumph so as to "subtly upstage Inigo Jones' fantastic designs or, rather, render them back into words" (69).
A playgoer capable of putting two and two together in the one case is capable of putting two and two together in the other.
As part of a live performance, a prophetic speech works differently on playgoers than such speeches might in written prose or poetry.
On reexperiencing Coriolanus, playgoers attuned to my argument might notice that other dark utterances of the protagonist of the same general kind as his curses and yet different from them might qualify as "speech-waste.
A suggestion of Henry's concerning the duel he and Williams are to fight might cause a playgoer to believe he regards Williams as more than a commoner.
A playgoer or reader receptive to my argument can survey--to use a visual metaphor--Henry's character and know it without having to choose between contradictory types.
late Renaissance playgoer would have assumed that any command in a
This will prove a valuable source of background information both for the student and the playgoer.
For example, an apparently straightforward stage direction such as "enter a jailor" or "keeper" may be as elliptical or incomplete as "Exit corse" if such a figure would be assumed to have a distinctive costume and be carrying a large set of keys so as to convey to a playgoer a sense of enter in prison.
I have been a regular playgoer for more than 30 years and All Balls And Ashes is, in my opinion, probably the funniest play I and my family have ever seen.
If an early modern English playgoer only heard the following verses spoken without seeing the speaker or knowing the character's identity, he or she might believe, judging from both the diction and content, that they issued from a stage Puritan's mouth: