playgoer


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playgoer

a person who goes to theatre performances, esp frequently
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The edges of the metropolis were physically and socially demarcated by playwrights and playgoers.
During the 1580s these distinctions that we now take for granted--between playtext and performance, playgoer and player--were only hesitantly beginning to emerge.
Marlowe's astute playgoer, however, remains doubtful.
A playgoer or reader receptive to my argument can survey--to use a visual metaphor--Henry's character and know it without having to choose between contradictory types.
15), so that she and the playgoer see the entering figure at the same time.
After the oracle had been read Hicks sat silent for a moment while everyone else rejoiced and the playgoer wondered how he would react, then he erupted.
The image of the reader in playbook prefaces is more positive than many contemporary images of playgoers.
Q I HAVE a booklet called The Playgoer which is the magazine for the Cass Theatre in Michigan where Mae West was performing in a play called Come on Up.
And so, when a playgoer or reader reconsiders lago's assertion at the beginning of the play that Cassio "had th'election" in the light of Cassio's later predestinarian utterances in his act 2 dialogue with lago, he or she wonders whether Cassio is elect in the play's theology.
The experience for the playgoer is akin to having a heart-to-heart with the notorious jazz musician over very mellow whiskey.
As well as putting up with shenanigans in the pit, especially when students were present, the serious playgoer also had to endure the inconsiderate behaviour of the wealthier clientele that was generally more concerned to flaunt its superiority than to watch the show, even if that involved blocking other people's view of the stage with monstrous hats.
As such, Churchill's work is notable for its open-endedness, for the peculiar relationship it establishes between the play and the playgoer, and for what Kritzer terms a "theatre of process" that "invites participation through a gestic presentation of existing realities that demand questioning and reformulation" (191).