poison sumac


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poison sumac:

see poison ivypoison ivy,
 poison oak,
and poison sumac,
woody vines and trailing or erect shrubs of the family Anacardiaceae (sumac family), native to North America.
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poison sumac

poison sumac

The fuzzy berries are WHITE. Do not touch.

poison sumac

[′pȯiz·ən ′sü‚mak]
(botany)
Rhus vernix. A tall bush of the sumac family (Anacardiaceae) bearing pinnately compound leaves with 7-13 entire leaflets, and drooping, axillary clusters of white fruits that produce an irritating oil.
References in periodicals archive ?
While these poison sumac varieties are more easily identified by the fruits, which droop from the branch and are white or gray, staghorn sumacs and other non-poisonous varieties can be spotted by the deeply crimson, round and somewhat-hairy drupes they sport on their upright stalks.
Poison sumac prefers boggy areas, especially in the south.
The poison sumac Toxicodendron vernix is classified in a different genus (along with poison ivy and poison oak).
Prudently, I refused Chad's request for a piggyback ride to the nearest stand of poison sumac.
Poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac grow almost everywhere in the United States, except Hawaii, Alaska and some desert areas of Nevada.
It belongs instead to the cashew family, as do its relatives, poison ivy and poison sumac.
Get acquainted with poison oak and poison sumac, too, however less common they may be in your particular neck of the woods.
The rhus plants include poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac.
But this little ditty ignores poison sumac, which has seven leaves and is just as bothersome.
And while poison ivy and poison oak tend to appear with three, broad leaves, poison sumac can have stems supporting seven to 13 leaves.
Ivy-Dry Super, he says, can be used to relieve the itching associated with poison ivy, poison sumac, poison oak, insect bites, eczema, psoriasis, dermatitis and rashes, and requires less effort to use than traditional finger pump sprays.
A history of exposure to common contact allergens, such as a recent run-in with poison ivy, poison oak, or poison sumac, may be all that is needed.