polar crystal

polar crystal

[′pō·lər ′krist·əl]
(solid-state physics)
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The real part of the dielectric function of a polar crystal [39, 43] with the presence of dissipation can be written as [[epsilon].
McGurn, "Photonic band structures of two-dimensional systems fabricated from rods of a cubic polar crystal," Phys.
These include direct PWE formulations for PCs constructed with lossless metals [37], metals with dissipations [38], polar crystals [39, 40], and superconducting composite [41].
The nature of the analytical roots of the cubic equation explains the appearance of dispersionless bands in the photonic band structure of 2D PCs with polar crystals [39, 40, 43].
omega]) for dielectric functions of a two-level quantum dot [49], polar crystals [39,43], and Drude-like materials.
Previously, polar crystals have been used in the investigations for the enhancement of the photonic band gap and investigation of coexisting polaritonic band gap in PCs [39,40,54,55].
2]] for polar crystals with nonzero dissipation (gamma) is P([omega]) = [[omega].
Indeed, by numerical example we showed that for the particular case of a two-dimensional photonic crystal made of polar crystals, scalar polynomial [which is a result of Equation (8) with only one mode of the backbone photonic crystal] yields accurate eigenfrequencies.
They found that tiny ice crystals started to form at temperatures 4[degrees] to 5[degrees]C higher in the polar crystals than in the nonpolar crystals.