Pollyanna

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Pollyanna

the “glad child,” extraordinarily optimistic. [Children’s Lit.: Pollyanna]

Pollyanna

always finds something to be glad about. [Am. Lit.: Pollyanna; Am. Cinema: Pollyanna in Disney Films, 170–172]
References in periodicals archive ?
The early peace movement, often seen as Pollyannaish, was in fact divided with respect to the prospects for international peace.
It avoids both the often heavy-handed, dark aesthetic that can leave viewers feeling simply depressed or angry while also avoiding a Pollyannaish perspective that erases all traces of the reality of suffering.
I don't mean to sound Pollyannaish when I say this, but it might even up the leverage of power a little bit if entrepreneurs have another option out there.
She realizes it may sound bizarre and more than a little Pollyannaish, but Kaiser firmly believes the accident was a turning point for good in her life.
This outlook goes quite a bit beyond Pollyannaish and arrives rather nearer to Panglossian.
However Pollyannaish they were--or political, as they were trying to avoid a Lehman-type fallout--many observers, including this author, continue to believe that a Greek default is inevitable.
It sounds Pollyannaish, but when things get tough, something you daydream about secretly that you would do for free can make a huge difference in terms of your performance and your competitors.
Moreover, his idea that the Palestinian problem should be resolved through an international court system seems Pollyannaish to the extreme, given the respect most Middle Eastern regimes have for international sanctions or agreements.
Lewis is neither Pollyannaish nor darkly pessimistic in dealing with this question.
So we're not Pollyannaish about saying that we know everything about who we're dealing with, but I can say that based on the experience that we've had so far, they are off to a good start in word and deed, and do not seem to be, at least in the statements and the actions that they've taken, in any way incompatible with the kind of ideals that we would be advocating in that situation.
Pielke demolishes pollyannaish claims that the United States and other nations can dramatically reduce greenhouse gas emissions at modest economic costs: "assertions that we have all the technology we need (or soon will) simply do not square with the numbers in any practical sense.
These are worth addressing, but it is possible to be encouraging and find a positive side without being Pollyannaish or naive, even if it is nothing more than asking the teacher if, say, plagiarism truly reflects most students' performance.