polonium-210

polonium-210

[pə′lō·nē·əm ¦tü′ten]
(nuclear physics)
Radioactive isotope of polonium; mass 210, half-life 140 days, α-radiation; used to calibrate radiation counters, and in oil well logging and atomic batteries. Also known as radium F.
References in periodicals archive ?
The 43-year-old was poisoned in London in November 2006 by radioactive polonium-210.
Relations between Britain and Russia have been strained since ex-KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko was poisoned with polonium-210 in London in 2006 - a killing which a British inquiry said was probably approved by President Vladimir Putin
A public inquiry concluded earlier this year that the killing of Mr Litvinenko - an outspoken critic of Vladimir Putin who died after drinking tea laced with radioactive polonium-210 - had "probably" been carried out with the Russian president's approval.
He was granted British citizenship but in November 2006 was poisoned with polonium-210.
November 1, 2006: Litvinenko meets Kovtun and Lugovoi at London's Millennium Hotel, and drinks tea with Polonium-210.
He said he suspected he was also exposed to polonium-210, the radioactive poison that killed Litvinenko.
Kovtun and AndreiLugovoi are suspected of murdering Litvinenko, who died weeks after drinking tea laced with radioactive polonium-210 in London, in November 2006.
Mr Litvinenko, 43, a former Russian spy who is thought to have been working for British secret service MI6 during his time in the UK, died at University College Hospital nearly three weeks after he had consumed tea laced with polonium-210 on November 1 at the Millennium Hotel in London's Grosvenor Square.
The 43-year-old Russian, known as Sasha to his loved ones, died after drinking tea laced with radioactive polonium-210 with two former colleagues at a London hotel in 2006.
The conclusion contradicts the findings of Swiss forensic scientists, who concluded last month that samples taken from Arafat's exhumed body were consistent with polonium-210 exposure, but did not definitely prove that he was poisoned.
Swiss scientists examining Yasir Arafat's remains and possessions say they have found levels of radioactive polonium-210 high enough to "reasonably support" the theory that the late chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization was poisoned when he died in 2004 at age 75.
The Swiss scientists said Thursday that they found elevated traces of polonium-210 and lead in Arafat's remains, and that the timeframe of Arafat's illness and death was consistent with poisoning from ingesting polonium.