polygraph


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polygraph

an instrument for the simultaneous electrical or mechanical recording of several involuntary physiological activities, including blood pressure, skin resistivity, pulse rate, respiration, and sweating, used esp as a would-be lie detector

Polygraph

 

a multichanneled oscillograph for simultaneously recording readings of several physiological functions, such as respiration, blood pressure, brain and muscle bioelectricity, and motor reactions. The most common type is the general-purpose polygraph, a multichanneled oscillograph that records with ink various bioelectric and nonelectric processes by means of appropriate biological sensors and adapters. The polygraph is used in physiological experiments to investigate interacting and interdependent bodily functions; it is also used in clinical diagnosis.

polygraph

[′päl·i‚graf]
(engineering)
References in periodicals archive ?
With regard to other relevant evidence, the military judge balances the probative value with the risk of unfair prejudice; (18) however, MRE 707 precludes SFC Smith from disclosing the existence of the polygraph test even though he is not seeking to admit the results.
Once the attorney knows that the client is willing to submit to an examination, numerous issues exist: 1) choosing the appropriate examiner; 2) whether to advise opposing counsel in advance of the polygraph; 3) if opposing counsel is not advised in advance of the polygraph, deciding when to disclose the existence of the polygraph report; 4) if opposing counsel is not advised in advance of the polygraph report, whether to offer opposing counsel the opportunity to have a second examination taken by an examiner chosen by opposing counsel; and 5) when to advise the arbitrators of the existence of the report and your intended use of the report at the final hearing.
Terry suggested Sullivan should ask the victim to take a polygraph test as well.
The polygraph operator will interpret the responses and, in a final interview, the subject will be told the results of the test and asked to account for failures.
Historically, polygraphs have been a tool used by law enforcement and prosecutors to evaluate the victim in a sex crime case as well.
In summarizing the shortcomings of the police response to the crime, reporter Benjamin Poston wrote: "Investigators had not conducted a polygraph test, taken a blood sample, thoroughly questioned Kezer or checked his alibis, according to police records.
It was Harish Kumar's willingness to take a polygraph in May 2002 after police found his wife, two children and mother brutally strangled and burned in their Hollywood Hills home that helped Pietrantoni and his partner quickly clear Kumar from the list of suspects.
The polygraph expert would need security clearance prior to being allowed into the establishment.
The Lie Detectors is a shaggy dog, unruly with anecdotes and built loosely around the narratives of two outsize Jazz Age personalities: Leonarde Keeler, an avid amateur polygraph enthusiast, a charmer, a womanizer, and a drunk; and John Larson, a psychologist and America's first doctoral cop, who adapted and refined the lie detector from an earlier model assembled by the creator of Wonder Woman.
COMPUTERIZED PICTURE POLYGRAPH Modified From ACVII (B) 1987, R&D 1986-2004
But outside of polygraphs, it's difficult to hear what the voice isn't saying.
Critics of the polygraph have sought its discontinuance for years, calling it a "junk science" with no scientific basis.