polygraph


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polygraph

an instrument for the simultaneous electrical or mechanical recording of several involuntary physiological activities, including blood pressure, skin resistivity, pulse rate, respiration, and sweating, used esp as a would-be lie detector

Polygraph

 

a multichanneled oscillograph for simultaneously recording readings of several physiological functions, such as respiration, blood pressure, brain and muscle bioelectricity, and motor reactions. The most common type is the general-purpose polygraph, a multichanneled oscillograph that records with ink various bioelectric and nonelectric processes by means of appropriate biological sensors and adapters. The polygraph is used in physiological experiments to investigate interacting and interdependent bodily functions; it is also used in clinical diagnosis.

polygraph

[′päl·i‚graf]
(engineering)
References in periodicals archive ?
The Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI) told the court that the polygraph can be conducted on Verma any day after August 8.
Polygraph tests - otherwise known as lie detectors - are not accepted by UK courts because their accuracy has never been proven.
Eye detection tests can be taken by multiple people at once but officers can only test one at a time using polygraph machines.
Prof Grubin says two-thirds of polygraph tests result in police getting information and intelligence which they did not have before.
Matthew Thornton, project manager at Lead Partner, NetComposites said, "It is a pleasure to welcome HMG Paints into the PolyGraph project consortium.
The following privileged users are subject to the Navy's Random Counterintelligence Polygraph Program:
The polygraph can detect people's gender, tiny facial expressions, skin color, temperature, heart rate and voice characteristics through its camera and non-contact sensor.
Fair Defence barrister Martin Steen said if probation officers are allowed to use polygraphs they should also be admissible evidence.
law enforcement agencies have dropped the polygraph in favor of newer computer voice stress analyzer (CVSA) technology to detect when suspects being questioned are not being honest, according to a report from the National Association of Computer Voice Stress Analysts.
In Company Man: Thirty Years of Controversy and Crisis in the CIA (Scribner), Rizzo writes that "lawyers are generally lousy at taking polygraph exams.
Jaime has established a successful small business in the uncharted niche of forensic investigation, polygraph testing, assessments and verifying of statements.