polygyny


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Related to polygyny: Sororal Polygyny

polygyny

1. the practice or condition of being married to more than one wife at the same time
2. the practice in animals of a male mating with more than one female during one breeding season
3. the condition in flowers of having many carpels

polygyny

a form of plural marriage where a man has more than one wife. This is viewed as a strategy which allows powerful males to control reproductive resources and to tactically manipulate kin ties. Far more common than its opposite, POLYANDRY, it is a subclass of POLYGAMY.

Polygyny

 

the practice of having more than one wife; a form of marriage existing throughout history and found chiefly in patriarchies. In its late forms, polygyny was retained in the class society of certain Muslim peoples of the East as a privilege of the ruling classes. Polygamy, a less precise term, is sometimes used instead of polygyny.

References in periodicals archive ?
In his final judgment, Bauman argues that polygyny is an innate biological drive kept in check by the institution of monogamy.
David Schnier and Brooke Hintman, An Analysis of Polygyny in Ghana: The Perpetuation of Gender Based Inequity in Africa, 2 Georgetown J.
Aquinas's complaint is that both polyandry and polygyny create situations in which the natural desire to engage freely in sexual intercourse is restricted, and that these restrictions lead to conflicts between spouses.
1,21 (2000), the colonial governments intended for this type of tax to constitute such an economic burden that eventually polygyny would disappear.
Bove R and Valeggia C, Polygyny and women's health in sub-Saharan Africa, Social Science & Medicine, 2009, 68(1):21-29.
75) On this second point, his analysis was explicitly focused on the gendered reality that worldwide and throughout history, polygamy has almost always been practiced as polygyny (one man, multiple women).
Laws range from banning polygyny to making it legal; from declaring equal rights and duties for both spouses in marriage, to mandating the wife's obedience to her husband; from secluding women, limiting their freedom of movement, requiring them to get permission from their "guardian" for work or travel, to sanctioning situations in which Muslim women can remain single if so they wish, become taxi drivers, imams, union leaders or heads of state; from promoting tolerance and freedom of opinion to imposing the death penalty for "un-Islamic" behavior or alleged blasphemy.
In her Memoirs (1926) Halide Edib, Turkish writer and feminist, described her personal experiences during the formation of the pro-nationalist Turkish Republic and with patriarchal views on polygyny and divorce (Lewis & Micklewright, 2006).
If, on the other hand, early humans experienced a social life favouring either short-term mating strategies, polygyny, or irregular sexual encounters between various sexual partners, keeping a permanently refreshed store of sperm would prove to be useful for all those males who had infrequent rather than regular sexual intercourse.
But the ecologists also found evidence that the males monopolise space in certain core territorial areas, suggesting that their mating system is a complicated combination of polygyny, whereby one male monopolises many females, and promiscuity.
11) The requirements for, and consequences of, civil unions are similar to civil marriages, but neither form allows polygyny (marriage between one man and more than one wife).