polyhedrosis


Also found in: Dictionary.

polyhedrosis

[‚päl·i·hē′drō·səs]
(invertebrate zoology)
Any of several virus diseases of insect larvae characterized by the breakdown of tissues and presence of polyhedral granules. Also known as polyhedral disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
Analysis of the polyhedrin gene promoter of the Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus.
We propagated Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcNPV; ATCC); its derivative AcCOPSNo10 (16), which displays a 17-amino acid epitope of HIV-1 gp120 N-terminally fused with a second copy of the major envelope protein gp64; and the construct AcZZVSVgTM-EGFP (17) in SP (Spodoptera frugiperda; ATCC) with standard methods (18).
The Anagrapha falcifera nuclear polyhedrosis virus liquefies the pests' tissues, while posing no threat to beneficial insects, humans, or wildlife.
Hamm and his coworkers field-tested the new duster with a nuclear polyhedrosis virus (NPV), which kills corn earworm and tobacco budworm caterpillars.
A number of studies center around the naturally occurring nuclear polyhedrosis virus (NPV), which is specific to gypsy moths and causes epidemic disease and death in dense populations.
Gemstar(R) utilizes a naturally occurring nuclear polyhedrosis virus (NPV) isolated from the cotton bollworm and enclosed in proteins.
Nuclear polyhedrosis virus (NPV) is one of the 2 taxonomic groups of baculoviruses and has many advantages including host specificity, excellent control effects, no non-target effects, and low levels of resistance response (Nguyen et al.
This plasmid was transferred into the Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcNPV) genome by homologous recombination so that High Five[TM] insect cells were transfected with the transfer vector and AcNPV DNA.
One recruit is a natural insect pathogen known as a Spodoptera exigua nuclear polyhedrosis virus (SeNPV).
is hoping to get EPA approval to begin field testing an autographa californica multicapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) into which company scientists have inserted a scorpion gene.
Feeding and dispersion of Spodoptera exigua larvae and its relevance for control with a nuclear polyhedrosis virus.
Entomologists plan this spring to test an improved version of one of the moth's natural predators, the nuclear polyhedrosis virus (NPV).