polynomial trend

polynomial trend

[¦päl·i¦nō·mē·əl ‚trend]
(statistics)
A trend line which is best approximated by a polynomial function; used in time series analysis.
References in periodicals archive ?
For example for the per capita income, the equation of the best fit polynomial trend lines is quadratic in nature with R2 value as 0.
Phase II also showed a similarity of pattern by trend line categorization in which polynomial trend lines showed the highest [r.
Phase II group mean HR response was best fit by a polynomial trend line ([r.
The depth of each eclipse during outburst was measured by taking the difference in magnitude between the 4th order polynomial trend at mid-eclipse and the fitted minimum magnitude.
Polynomial trend lines have been used to graphically display trends in data and to analyze problems in relation to the last 50 years climate scenario and to predict future trends.
In Badin area, the polynomial trend shows a consistent decline of temperature from 1961 upto mid of 1980's and after that it is again uprising steadily upto 2004 and also indicates the continuation of this rise further in years to come.
The method involved iterated universal Kriging that combines a spatial covariance function with a polynomial trend surface.
However, because the surfaces suggested by TPS were very similar to fitting a second order polynomial trend surface, it was decided to use universal Kriging models that combine the spatial covariance function with a polynomial trend surface.
05 is presented to compare rate means within entries only when polynomial trend analysis was significant at P < 0.
The data illustrate that: (1) regression approaches to ANOVA can be superior to classical ANOVA with respect to statistical power against Type II error; and (2) classical regression analysis can be used to test hypotheses typically but incorrectly associated only with ANOVA, such as polynomial trend and interaction hypotheses.
On the other hand for decision making in CP MDP it is significant to detect the level shifts and/or polynomial trends with reasonable computational complexity.