Polyptych

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Polyptych

 

(1) A painting or relief consisting of several panels.

(2) Several pictures with a common subject and unity of color and composition.

References in periodicals archive ?
Although I myself could not read the final digit of the inscription, the Ponteranica polyptych has apparently been conclusively proved to date from 1522; similarly, the Brescia Adoration of the Shepherds has been revealed to date from 1530 (Fig.
It centered around the control and display of the prize relics that were associated with the polyptychs that the nuns had commissioned in the 1440s.
Rooms five and six are a detective's playground, examining fragments of polyptychs and questioning the precise purpose of certain images.
The title The Propitious Garden of Plane Image--which Marden has given to three polyptychs, two of which are included in the show--appears to play on this Voltairean horticultural metaphor, although Pollock, too, spoke of "gardening" his paintings.
This is followed by two contributions that treat altarpieces and religious orders: Joanna Cannon examines Sienese polyptychs and the Dominicans, while Gaudenz Freuler illuminates the role that altarpieces played in promoting the cult of San Bernardino.
The workshop did little but pay tribute to Antonello in the decades following his death, churning out 'Antonello style' altarpieces and polyptychs for churches particularly in the northern and eastern regions of the island.
This approach engenders a tone of monastic serenity that is heightened by the hinged-panel format of six of the works, which evokes religious polyptychs.
In part three, devoted exclusively to the National Gallery, there are 69 full pane color plates, each of these has its own separately numbered comparative material, including reconstructions, polyptychs shown closed, paintings seen from the back, related works by the same artists, as well as small color details.
Earlier images of this type took the form of polyptychs, composed of a central panel that featured the Virgin and Child with separate, framed panels attached on either side that bore images of saints.
In long arrays of canvases hung one next to the other or arranged to construct vast polyptychs, Tirelli uses his repertoire of forms and signs to present anew the secular mystery of seeing and its concomitant inner reflection.
Information about the form of polyptychs and the manner of their commissioning has a more general application, as indeed does much of the information about the theological and symbolic significance of the images.