pomander


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pomander

1. a mixture of aromatic substances in a sachet or an orange, formerly carried as scent or as a protection against disease
2. a container for such a mixture
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Horsfield, "The Pomander of Prayer: Aspects of Late Medieval English Carthusian Spirituality and Its Lay Audience," in "De Celia in Seculum": Religious and Secular Life and Devotion in Late Medieval England: An Interdisciplinary Conference in Celebration of the Eighth Centenary of the Consecration of St Hugh of Avalon Bishop of Lincoln, 20-22 July, 1986, ed.
One pours slip into a mould, while her companions clean away excess clay; and, inset, a Staffordshire street scene; right, a falcon-shaped pomander, price: pounds 2,064
The pomander tree she and a friend put together one Saturday morning also borrowed from Colonial tradition.
Jamie Snowden's mare bounced right back to form there in first-time blinkers, coming home a clear second behind smart winner Pomander.
Writer Ann Beatts, interviewed in the Gilda Radner segment in Making Trouble, joked that none of the writers on Saturday Night Live (SNL) saw the humor in a line that a character was a few cloves away from finishing a pomander ball.
The torso stuck with electrodes tightly as a pomander.
A pomander (originally pome d'ambre) was a small ball or bag containing dried apples and spices carried about in the Middle Ages to ward off the plague.
Songs of the Fruits and Sweets of Childhood" shows Goodison's nimble and vivid craft wrapping itself around the syllables and images of childhood delicacies: "Cream pink pomander / like a lady's sachet / is the genteel roseapple.
Day monopolized publication of sermons by Hugh Latimer -- a hero of the "Book of Martyrs" -- and writings by Becon, which included the Elizabethan best sellers, the Pomander of Prayer and Sick Man's Salve.
I have sold all my trumpery; not a counterfeit stone, not a ribbon, glass, pomander, brooch, table book, ballad, knife, tape, glove, shoe tie, bracelet, horn ring, to keep my pack from fasting.
A small topiary, often called a floral pomander, may be carried (see Figure 1-33a).