Pond


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Wikipedia.

pond

[pänd]
(geography)
A small natural body of standing fresh water filling a surface depression, usually smaller than a lake.
(mechanics)

Pond

 

an artificial reservoir dug to a depth of 3–5 m or created by the construction of dams in the valleys of small rivers or streams or in areas of gorges or gullies. A pond is usually no more than 1 sq km in area; it must have sufficiently steep banks, a slightly sloping bottom, and an erosion-resistant floor. If it is fed by the runoff of river or subsurface waters, the pond will only be filled in the spring by melting snow. Outlets are frequently installed to remove surplus water. In rural areas, ponds are built for irrigation, fish and waterfowl breeding, and the storage of water for various purposes. In cities and recreation areas, ponds are used for fishing, swimming, and other sports.

References in classic literature ?
But the waters of the pond rose up suddenly, overflowed the bank where the couple stood, and dragged them under the flood.
Paths from everywhere crowd like children to the pond.
And how could you think o' going to the pond, and taking your sister where there was dirt?
The idea of Maggie sitting alone by the pond roused an habitual fear in Mrs.
he thought, and he looked at his own naked body and shuddered, not from cold but from a sense of disgust and horror he did not himself understand, aroused by the sight of that immense number of bodies splashing about in the dirty pond.
In considering these several means of distribution, it should be remembered that when a pond or stream is first formed, for instance, on a rising islet, it will be unoccupied; and a single seed or egg will have a good chance of succeeding.
We agreed that it should be carried into execution, and that Provis should never recognize us if we came below Bridge and rowed past Mill Pond Bank.
The first time I passed Mill Pond Bank, Herbert and I were pulling a pair of oars; and, both in going and returning, we saw the blind towards the east come down.
Halfway up the path she met Jane and Diana rushing back to the pond in a state narrowly removed from positive frenzy.
We've gone and lost your father's flat, Diana, and I have a presentiment that we'll not be allowed to row on the pond any more.
The dead and for the most part unmerchantable wood behind my house, and the driftwood from the pond, have supplied the remainder of my fuel.
You will notice that these two cuttings have only one thing in common, which is the mention of Pilgrim's Pond, the estate, as you know, of the millionaire Ireton Todd.