ponderosa pine


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ponderosa pine

[‚pän·də‚rō·sə ′pīn]
(botany)
Pinus ponderosa. A hard pine tree of western North America; attains a height of 150-225 feet (46-69 meters) and has long, dark-green leaves in bundles of two to five and tawny, yellowish bark.
References in periodicals archive ?
We found average posttreatment nonwinter home-range sizes to be consistent with the pretreatment study results (Table 2), which adds support for current ponderosa pine forest management approaches related to squirrel habitat.
Red oak samples generally experienced the largest uptakes for a given moisture condition/treatment process followed by ponderosa pine.
Although recent studies have documented White-headed Woodpeckers inhabiting early to mid-seral Ponderosa Pine forests (Lindstrand and Humes 2009; Kozma 2011), their breeding biology in these forests, particularly those influenced by timber management, remains poorly studied.
Over the course of the next years, we will plant 441,000 seedlings of Ponderosa pine across the Long Pines Unit, restoring a great part of it to habitable conditions.
In each of these experiments we used five pairs of open ponderosa pine cones, with all of the spines removed from one cone in each pair (we used the same cones as those used in the first experiments on open cones).
However, despite the fact that seeds were inedible, rodents destroyed at least 11 lodgepole pine seeds, 18 ponderosa pine seeds and 28 Jeffrey pine seeds.
Red squirrels favor spruce-fir and, to a lesser extent, mixed conifer forests, whereas Abert's squirrels prefer ponderosa pine (Ferner, 1974; Allred, 2011).
Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) is widely distributed from southern British Columbia to the southern Rocky Mountains in Arizona.
This book profiles 25 botanical specimens collected by the duo, including Osage orange, snowberry, camas, bearberry, and ponderosa pine.
Collins' land is now covered in dense stands of Ponderosa pine, with shade-tolerant white fir struggling for space in the canopy.
Common tree species (generally from low to high elevations) are: ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta), aspen (Populus tremuloides), blue spruce (Picea pungens), Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii), subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa), and limber pine (Pinusflexilis).