positive charge


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Related to positive charge: negative charge

positive charge

[′päz·əd·iv ′chärj]
(electricity)
The type of charge which is possessed by protons in ordinary matter, and which may be produced in a glass object by rubbing with silk.
References in periodicals archive ?
Following Bristol-Myers Squibb's national survey on the HIV/AIDS epidemic and considering the areas around the country that are most affected by the disease, 13 regions, including some that are part of the NAF's extensive Community Partnership network, were identified by NAF as geographic areas of interest to be considered for Positive Charge grants.
In column leaching experiments, Donn and Menzies (2005) have shown that a decrease in the positive charge density occurred upon the application of a low [mu] rainwater solution.
Normally, in-cloud lightning flashes develop in the lower, negatively charged part of the cloud; if they happen to reach higher within the cloud, the positive charges higher up cancel out the negative charge, stopping the flash.
Lightning results when negatively charged clouds induce a positive charge in the objects below them.
Because the bacterial cells were negatively charged, and the wafer and nanoparticles had positive charges, the particles glommed on to the bacteria and stayed there when the wafer dried.
A separate input is available to externally increase the default delay of the positive charge pump.
Chemical analyses of basalt drilled from the ocean floor show that in new rock being extruded from midocean ridges, only about 15 percent of the iron atoms are ions that have a triple dose of positive charge.
Unlike electrons, which each have a single negative charge, or protons, which have a single positive charge, anyons can have a charge that is a fraction of a whole number--something never before seen in physics.
reveal a slight positive charge at the neutron's center and a slight negative charge at its surface.
More specifically, while passing through thunderstorms or an electrically charged environment, the aircraft starts polarizing, with one end gaining positive charge and other becoming more negatively charged.
To create an electrical current, two particles, one with a negative charge (electron) and one with a positive charge (electron-hole), must separate despite being bound tightly together.
Within the storm's electric field, the negative charge travels toward the ground, and the positive charge moves higher in the clouds, creating favorable conditions for lightning.

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