positive phototaxis

positive phototaxis

[¦päz·əd·iv ‚fōd·ō′tak·səs]
(physiology)
The orientation and movement of an organism toward the source of a light stimulus.
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Species can be attracted to, or disoriented by, sources of artificial light through positive phototaxis (Verheijen 1985; Longcore and Rich 2004).
max] 480 nm) stimulate positive phototaxis and longer wavelengths inhibit [phototaxis].
However, a common misunderstanding is that this attraction represents a positive phototaxis.
Based on the premise that in the absence of moonlight, sandflies would exhibit positive phototaxis and be attracted to light traps, a maximum catch would be expected during a new moon.
Positive phototaxis, manifest as an increase in OD, was observed for wavelengths between 440 nm and 538 nm with a maximum phototactic response at 503 nm.
A study by Yasuda (1995) suggests that females are attracted to flush, while males might tend to settle on flush through positive phototaxis and/or negative geotaxis.