postimperialism

postimperialism

a concept in which the ending of COLONIALISM after World War II and the emergence of several major economic and political national groupings are associated with the end of exploitative relationships between nations characteristic of the period of IMPERIALISM from the end of the 19th-century until the mid-20th. This idea was particularly developed from the mid-1970s by political scientists in the US, notably Richard L. Sklar and David G. Becker (see Becker et al., 1987, for some key essays). They take the view that capitalism in the late 20th-century involves nonexploitative relations between nation states and a growing congruence between the interests of dominant classes internationally Central to the analysis is not just the end of colonialism but the idea that MULTINATIONAL COMPANIES bring benefits to THIRD WORLD countries in the form of capital, secure markets and technologies. These companies no longer necessarily represent the national interests of their countries of origin, the industrial capitalist societies. Further, the bourgeoisie in the Third World involved in these enterprises are nationalistic, counter to FRANK's argument that they comprise a comprador bourgeoisie (see COMPRADOR CAPITALIST).

These arguments run counter to those of DEPENDENCY THEORY and many other contemporary approaches to the Third World. Whilst it is recognized that there are problems with nearly all such general approaches, postimperialism theory has had limited impact. This is because of disagreements over the beneficial role of multinational corporations for Third World countries and scepticism about the role of the national bourgeoisie in economic development. see also UNEQUAL EXCHANGE.

References in periodicals archive ?
As part of this, some of us regionalize French postimperialism into a broader adventure into Africa.
In Postimperialism and World Politics (1999), which they edited, Richard Sklar argues that "in all modern societies, socialist thought and policy interact with capitalist thought and policy in enterprises and society at large, as is manifest in labor relations, various forms of industrial democracy, and participatory rights for labor unions, communities, and consumer groups.
Sklar's The Corporate Reconstruction of American Capitalism: 1890-1916, Postimperialism and World Politics; N.
Postimperialism is a concept the editor uses to imply postcolonial factors from the point of view of those who were colonized by the British (i.
And the lack of a clear framework shows when Skak abandons a discussion of postimperialism in her treatment of Hungary.
I think that is already the case with the notion introduced at this roundtable to discard the term and substitute the word postimperialism.