care

(redirected from postoperative care)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal.
Related to postoperative care: preoperative care

CARE

(Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere), nonprofit, nonsectarian federation of agencies devoted to channeling relief and self-help materials to needy people in foreign countries. Organized in the United States (1945) to help war-ravaged Europe, CARE soon expanded its program to include developing nations in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Famous for its "CARE packages" of food and other necessities, CARE in now also involved in population, health care, land management, and small economic activity. It is now an international organization with 10 member countries and headquarters in Brussels.

care

  1. the work involved in supporting people who, because of physical frailty chronic illness or other forms of incapacity and disability, are incapable of leading an autonomous existence.
  2. other kinds of carework, e.g. in child-rearing (see CHILD CARE) and DOMESTIC LABOUR. This should be distinguished from care in sense 1.
Care in sense 1 operates over a wide range of social relations. A clear dividing line can be drawn between formal and informal care (see Abrams, 1978) as it exists in contemporary industrial societies. Formal care refers to services provided by agents of organization (statutory, voluntary and/or private) to people within clearly defined categories of need. Informal care is personally directed towards certain people who have a social relationship with their carer - usually a family member, and most often a spouse (Parker, 1993), or female relative.

Feminist sociologists (see also FEMINISM) have had a major impact on the understanding of care and caring relationships. They have argued that caring is ‘a gendered concept’ and that women constitute the majority of carers both informally, in the private sphere, and as low-paid care workers (‘care assistants’) in the formal sector (Finch and Groves, 1982; Ungerson, 1987; Lewis and Meredith, 1988). Studies of caring have examined the complex reasons why women care and the particular problems and difficulties they face. Social policies involving decarceration and COMMUNITY CARE, the decline of neighbour-hood and COMMUNITY associated with increasing SOCIAL (and geographical) MOBILITY, have placed an increasing burden on individual women carers. There is some evidence that women are reluctant to enter caring relationships with female relatives but lack viable alternatives (Cotterill, 1994). Recent research using data from the 1980 British General Household Survey has also pointed to the significant contribution made by male carers, particularly men who care for their wives (Arber and Gilbert, 1989).

care, custody, and control

Describes a standard exclusion in liability insurance policies. Under this exclusion, the liability insurance does not apply to damage to property in the care or custody of the insured, or to damage to property over which the insured is for any purpose exercising physical control.

CARE

agency devoted to channeling relief to needy people abroad. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 456]

care

in (or into) care Social welfare made the legal responsibility of a local authority by order of a court
References in periodicals archive ?
This color-illustrated pocket reference on postoperative care provides info in outline format, covering patients in and out of the PACU.
With this study method, we can observe the pragmatic outcome and analyze the characteristics of patients/families that consented and declined the proposed mode of communication for postoperative care.
Guidelines for postoperative care in gynecologic/oncology surgery: Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) Society recommendations--part II.
2] The nursing staff are responsible for the postoperative care of the patient, but should remain in contact with the surgeon regarding the patient's condition until the postoperative care has been completed and the patient is discharged from hospital.
1, 2014 issue of Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery found that performing physical therapy before joint replacement surgery can lower the need for postoperative care by almost 30 percent, saving the average patient $ 1,215.
The most frequent complications in postoperative care units are nausea and vomiting, with an incidence rate between 10 and 30%.
Staff and patient education regarding the implications of surgical positioning on postoperative care and potential complications of robotic-assisted surgery is necessary.
The nurses were caring, knowledgeable and true educators in my postoperative care.
In submento-submandibular intubation, less postoperative care is required and patient discharged from the hospital early.
It assumes readers have basic surgical skills related to sterile technique, tissue handling, surgical anatomy, knot tying, suture patterns, and surgical judgment, and presents information on preoperative procedures, preparing the surgical site, postoperative care, surgical restraints, and surgery of various body parts and conditions, with details on indications, materials, surgical technique, suturing, and other aspects, and some illustrations.
Postoperative care and outcomes: The postoperative care and outcomes are shown in Table-III.
We recently provided postoperative analgesia with an intravenous dexmedetomidine infusion to a 43-year-old female patient in our postoperative care unit.

Full browser ?