praetor

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Related to praetorship: Urban praetor, Praetor Peregrinus

praetor

(prēt`ər), in ancient Rome, originally a consulconsul,
title of the two chief magistrates of ancient Rome. The institution is supposed to have arisen with the expulsion of the kings, traditionally in 510 B.C., and it was well established by the early 4th cent. B.C.
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, and later a judicial magistrate (from c.366 B.C.). In 242 B.C. two praetors were appointed, the urban praetor (praetor urbanus), deciding cases to which citizens were parties, and the peregrine praetor (praetor peregrinus) deciding cases between foreigners. The urban praetor exercised the functions of the consuls in their absence and of the peregrine praetor when he was holding a military command. Two additional praetors were appointed (227) to administer Sicily and Sardinia, and two more (197) to administer Spain. A principal duty of praetors was the production of the public games. Under the empire the functions of the praetor were gradually taken over by other magistrates.

Praetor

 

a state position in ancient Rome. Initially, in the early republican period, “praetor” was the title of the highest magistrates (consuls and dictators). In 367 (or 366) B.C., the position of praetor was instituted as a junior colleague of the consul. The praetor managed civil court cases on the basis of the praetorian edict, which he himself issued, and, in the absence of consuls, he had supreme power. In 242 B.C. two praetors were elected: the city praetor (praetor urbanus), who managed court trials among Roman citizens, and a praetor for foreigners (praetor peregrinus). Under Sulla, the number of praetors was increased to eight. After performance of their duties, praetors were sent to the provinces as propraetors or proconsuls. In the time of the empire the highest city officials were also called praetors.

praetor

, pretor
(in ancient Rome) any of several senior magistrates ranking just below the consuls
References in periodicals archive ?
This could well mean that Crassus had two postings in Iberia since Plutarch, even if ambiguous elsewhere, surely knew the difference between a praetorship and a consulship.
14) Carney (note 4) 23-24 refers to the period following the praetorship in a way that implies prior connections with the publicani: 'Marius, now a prominent member of a group of wealthy businessmen with connections in Puteoli in Southern Italy, came to be of such importance amongst the publicani .
The weakness of the case for his praetorship is disturbing in view of the evidence suggesting that Favonius was called upon for his sententia in January 49.
Doubt is cast upon the praetorship of Favonius on either interpretation.
Though his words have long been taken to mean that Favonius was defeated for the praetorship, they are actually as ambiguous with respect to the outcome of the election as they are about the office itself.
This means, however, that he was probably eligible for the praetorship by the 120s.
We have already seen that the grandfather of the consul of 62 probably reached the praetorship by c.
He is obviously exceptional, however, since his career was accelerated by Caesar: it seems that he became consul without ever having held the praetorship (RRC p.
21) The range of intervals between moneyership and praetorship is illustrated by the cases of P.
42-5), while that for candidacy for the praetorship was 39 (ibid.
Even if Eburnus's praetorship were to be placed earlier than usual, in 120, he could not have held Macedonia because its commander at that time, almost certainly the immediate predecessor of Sisenna, is known: Sex.
Fabius's titulature in the Dyme inscription in my view therefore should exclude 145, the most likely date of his (Servilianus's) praetorship.