premium

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premium

1. an amount paid in addition to a standard rate, price, wage, etc.; bonus
2. the amount above nominal or par value at which something sells
3. 
a. an offer of something free or at a specially reduced price as an inducement to buy a commodity or service
b. (as modifier): a premium offer
4. a fee, now rarely required, for instruction or apprenticeship in a profession or trade
References in classic literature ?
 INSURANCE AGENT: You spoke of saving the premiums which you would
You're a rough speaker, my friend, but you look an honest, open-hearted man,' said the old gentleman: turning his spectacles in the direction of the candidate for Oliver's premium, whose villainous countenance was a regular stamped receipt for cruelty.
And when they ARE at a premium,' said Mr Ralph Nickleby, smiling.
Mr Lammle came on the scene last, for he was always late, and so were the frequenters always late; all hands being bound to be made late, by private information about the Bourse, and Greek and Spanish and India and Mexican and par and premium and discount and three quarters and seven eighths.
Hardship and freedom: conditions under which the active, strong, and subtle survive and the weaker go to the wall; conditions that put a premium upon the loyal alliance of capable men, upon self-restraint, patience, and decision.
Why, because Gell was a fellow whose services were worth a premium.
I must give you the ninety-two pounds that I have put by for Alfred's premium," said Mrs.
Whether he thought the owners of the ship denied it to him, on account of its clotting his clear, sunny complexion; or whether he deemed that, on so long a voyage in such marketless waters, butter was at a premium, and therefore was not for him, a subaltern; however it was, Flask, alas
Take only twelve," said D'Artagnan, "and call the rest premium and brokerage.
And the premium, sir,' I returned, 'is a thousand pounds?
Pumblechook was in favour of a handsome premium for binding me apprentice to some genteel trade - say, the corn and seed trade, for instance.
In its original form, this law offered a premium for cat-heads (fourpence a-piece), but the Senate succeeded in amending the main clause, so as to substitute the word "tails" for "heads.