presuppression

presuppression

[¦prē·sə′presh·ən]
(geophysics)
In seismic prospecting, the suppression of the early events on a seismic record for control of noise and reflections on that portion of the record.
References in periodicals archive ?
The first part of the conclusion (411-26) offers both a window into visitor Palmeiro's spiritual life and a case study in the genre of early modern necrology; the second part (426-42) poses a convincing scholarly challenge to interpretations of the presuppression Jesuits as actors of "global" effect.
Congress responded to the excess-fuels story by increasing Forest Service fuel treatment budgets from about $10 million a year in 1990 to about $70 million a year in 2000 and by more than doubling presuppression or preparedness budgets, from $167 million to $409 million, over the same time period.
The response was to triple the funding for fuel treatments and increase presuppression funding by more than 50 percent.
Meteorologists in Boise then make daily, or even hourly, presuppression forecasts.
This was the case, for example, in China, and also in Canada, where the last remaining ex-Jesuit from the presuppression era, Jean-Joseph Casot (1728-1800), would die in 1800.
In terms of Jesuit self-identity during the 19th century, creating links with the presuppression Society and sustaining long-standing traditions was of the utmost importance.
It would be reasonable to suggest that the majority of work on Jesuit history is still dedicated to the presuppression era.
Theology is one arena, at least, where interest in the postrestoration Society matches interest in its presuppression forebear.
25) In many ways, Jesuits would never regain the level of cultural influence they had once enjoyed: their role on the political stage was, perforce, diminished once the link between throne and altar was severed or challenged in so many places; mission fields around the globe would become increasingly congested during the 19th century; and the Society's educational ministry (while brimming with energy and ambition in some places, not least the United States) would, on the whole, never regain its presuppression reach.