prevalence

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prevalence

[′prev·ə·ləns]
(genetics)
The frequency with which a medical condition is found in specific population at a specific time.
References in periodicals archive ?
The model was adjusted for gender, age, the number of other risk factors, pretest probability, EF, appropriate stress test, patients (admitted or out), and symptom.
Estimate the pretest probability of malignancy for a patient with a pulmonary nodule using your clinical judgment and/or by using a validated model, (B)
In this study high post-test diagnostic probability for the absence of coronary artery disease with a negative EST occurred when individual pretest probability of disease (PPD) levels equaled or fell to below 60%, and high post-test diagnostic certainty for CAD was reached for a positive EST when individualized PPD levels equaled or exceeded 89.
Bayes' theorem indicates that the post-test probability of a patient having CAD is based upon pretest probability and test accuracy (Figure 2).
Value of assessment of the pretest probability of deep vein thrombosis in clinical management.
Add the "scores" from these and find the pretest probability below:
If you apply [these tests] to populations that are at low pretest probability of having the disease, most of your results will be false positives.
This would increase the pretest probability of the impairment and consequently increase the protective value derived from changes to the underwriting requirements tailored to detect that impairment.
4) Note that Patient 2 has the same post-test probability that was estimated using the positive predictive value (accounting for rounding error), because he was assigned a pretest probability equal to the population prevalence.
We also review limitations of hair analysis in this setting; these limitations include patient factors such as low pretest probability of disease and test factors such as the lack of validation of analytic techniques, the inability to discern between exogenous contaminants and endogenous toxicants in hair, the variability of analytic procedures, low interlaboratory reliability, and the increased likelihood of false positive test results in the measurement of panels of analytes.
First, there is the risk of a false-positive test result, the magnitude of which depends on the pretest probability that a patient has been infected with the HIV virus.