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CARE

(Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere), nonprofit, nonsectarian federation of agencies devoted to channeling relief and self-help materials to needy people in foreign countries. Organized in the United States (1945) to help war-ravaged Europe, CARE soon expanded its program to include developing nations in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Famous for its "CARE packages" of food and other necessities, CARE in now also involved in population, health care, land management, and small economic activity. It is now an international organization with 10 member countries and headquarters in Brussels.

care

  1. the work involved in supporting people who, because of physical frailty chronic illness or other forms of incapacity and disability, are incapable of leading an autonomous existence.
  2. other kinds of carework, e.g. in child-rearing (see CHILD CARE) and DOMESTIC LABOUR. This should be distinguished from care in sense 1.
Care in sense 1 operates over a wide range of social relations. A clear dividing line can be drawn between formal and informal care (see Abrams, 1978) as it exists in contemporary industrial societies. Formal care refers to services provided by agents of organization (statutory, voluntary and/or private) to people within clearly defined categories of need. Informal care is personally directed towards certain people who have a social relationship with their carer - usually a family member, and most often a spouse (Parker, 1993), or female relative.

Feminist sociologists (see also FEMINISM) have had a major impact on the understanding of care and caring relationships. They have argued that caring is ‘a gendered concept’ and that women constitute the majority of carers both informally, in the private sphere, and as low-paid care workers (‘care assistants’) in the formal sector (Finch and Groves, 1982; Ungerson, 1987; Lewis and Meredith, 1988). Studies of caring have examined the complex reasons why women care and the particular problems and difficulties they face. Social policies involving decarceration and COMMUNITY CARE, the decline of neighbour-hood and COMMUNITY associated with increasing SOCIAL (and geographical) MOBILITY, have placed an increasing burden on individual women carers. There is some evidence that women are reluctant to enter caring relationships with female relatives but lack viable alternatives (Cotterill, 1994). Recent research using data from the 1980 British General Household Survey has also pointed to the significant contribution made by male carers, particularly men who care for their wives (Arber and Gilbert, 1989).

care, custody, and control

Describes a standard exclusion in liability insurance policies. Under this exclusion, the liability insurance does not apply to damage to property in the care or custody of the insured, or to damage to property over which the insured is for any purpose exercising physical control.

CARE

agency devoted to channeling relief to needy people abroad. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 456]

care

in (or into) care Social welfare made the legal responsibility of a local authority by order of a court
References in periodicals archive ?
Employed primary care physicians are significantly more content with their EHR (68% satisfied) than are independent primary care physicians (20% satisfied).
Eliminating the coding, claims submissions, prior authorizations and telephone time on hold with multiple insurance companies can also dramatically change the way direct primary care physicians practice.
Pocket Primary Care helps the busy clinician quickly find information they need at the bedside using tabs and a sturdy, six-ring binder.
In a recent survey of older graduates, UMass found that half were still practicing primary care.
To get at that data, the authors used the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) to calculate the use of office-based primary care in 2008, U.
Yet even with legislation in 2008 to address primary care physician shortages, the number of primary care doctors is still inadequate.
Shabana's hospital to establish a primary care screening program that captures every veteran at the institution who has not been seen by primary care within the previous 2 weeks.
So how do we go about making sure that primary care can take its rightful role at the heart of a healthy NHS?
Zonies' perception that the country needs more primary care doctors.
In part, the shortfall is because the fee schedule that favors medical specialties over primary care, and relative values are updated only every 5 years, which tends to magnify the difference in efficiency gains between technology-dependent specialties and primary care.
This creation of HEZs is intended to encourage primary care practices to remain located in, or relocate to, medically under-served areas, where many residents utilize the emergency room of a local hospital as their primary care facility.
Orrick (Clinical Assistant Professor at the University Colleges of Nursing and Pharmacy and Faculty Member of the Florida/Caribbean AIDS Education and Training Center), and Kimberly Alfonso (Assistant Director of the Florida/Caribbean AIDS education and Training Center), HIV/AIDS Primary Care Guide is an in-depth and "reader friendly" study focusing upon the complexity of the care and management of AIDS victims, as well as an informative treatise on the care and treatment of child, adolescent, and adult HIV/AIDS patients.

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