print


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print

1. a positive photographic image in colour or black and white produced, usually on paper, from a negative image on film
2. 
a. a fabric with a printed design
b. (as modifier): a print dress

Print

 

a fabric whose surface is decorated with a printed design. Prints originally were made by hand using blocks with raised designs. Later the term “print” was applied to all fabrics with designs made by printing machines.

print

[print]
(graphic arts)
A photographic copy made by placing a negative or transparency in contact with a sensitized surface or by projecting the image on a screen or sensitized photographic medium, and then developing the result.

print

1. A plaster cast of a flat ornament.
2.See printing.

PRINT

(language)
PRe-edited INTerpreter.

An early mathematics language for the IBM 705.

[Sammet 1969, p. 134].

print

To send information from the computer to an attached printer or to a printer in the network. See preview mode.
References in classic literature ?
Little did my highly-connected mother think that, among the colored prints in the shop-window, which disrespectfully illustrated the public and private proceedings of distinguished individuals, certain specimens bearing the classic signature of "Thersites Junior," were produced from designs furnished by her studious and medical son.
DEAR SIR--Please advertise a series of twelve Racy Prints, from my fertile pencil, entitled, 'Scenes of Modern Prison Life,' by Thersites Junior.
To supply the large demand for copies he investigated and mastered the new art by which they might be so wonderfully multiplied and about 1475, at fifty years of age, set up a press at Bruges in the modern Belgium, where he issued his 'Recueil,' which was thus the first English book ever put into print.
It was first fixed in print in the "Cornhill Magazine", being my first appearance in a serial of any kind; and I have lived long enough to see it guyed most agreeably by Mr.
But then, to think that Satan should take human shape upon him in such a place, where there could be no manner of occasion for it, but to leave the print of his foot behind him, and that even for no purpose too, for he could not be sure I should see it - this was an amusement the other way.
In the middle of these cogitations, apprehensions, and reflections, it came into my thoughts one day that all this might be a mere chimera of my own, and that this foot might be the print of my own foot, when I came on shore from my boat: this cheered me up a little, too, and I began to persuade myself it was all a delusion; that it was nothing else but my own foot; and why might I not come that way from the boat, as well as I was going that way to the boat?
I said these words with the greatest earnestness that I could lay upon them, and I repeat them in print here with equal earnestness.
Young lady, when I had read what's put in print of Stephen - and what has just as much truth in it as if it had been put in print of you - I went straight to the Bank to say I knew where Stephen was, and to give a sure and certain promise that he should be here in two days.
And also to an Act, entitled, "an Act, supplementary to an Act, for the encouragement of Learning, by securing the copies of Maps, Charts, and Books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the times herein mentioned, and extending the benefits thereof to the arts of designing, engraving, and etching historical and other prints.
Some fine old engravings from the grand landscapes of Claude (part of a collection of prints possessed by Miss Ladd's father) hung on the walls.
Very pretty," he remarked, looking round the room--without appearing to care for anything in it, except the prints.
Uncle Roger says the Daily Enterprise has gone to the dogs--all the news it prints is that some old woman has put a shawl on her head and gone across the road to have tea with another old woman.