sedation

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sedation

1. a state of calm or reduced nervous activity
2. the administration of a sedative

sedation

[si′dā·shən]
(medicine)
A state of lessened activity.
References in periodicals archive ?
Non-Parenteral Medications for Procedural Sedation in Children-A Narrative: Review Article.
Our hypothesis was that children who do not have any procedural sedation are more likely to have an unsuccessful LP.
They are proven to be successful in the detection of ET tube placement verification, breathing irregularities, and monitor procedural sedation.
A comparative evaluation of drops versus atomized administration of intranasal ketamine for the procedural sedation of young uncooperative pediatric dental patients: a prospective crossover trial.
It is also becoming more common in intensive care units and during procedural sedation.
The Uruguayan Society of Anesthesiologists and the American Society of Anesthesiologists recommended capnography monitoring in routine-use during procedural sedation and anesthetics.
They discuss basic principles, including epidemiology, the immature skeleton, pain management and procedural sedation, compartment syndrome, physeal injuries and growth disturbances, pathologic fractures, and recognition of child maltreatment, then various fractures of the upper and lower extremities and spine.
From the patient's perspective, they have time to ask their questions, gain a realistic understanding of the proposed port implantation procedure, and have time to discuss the nature of procedural sedation and any associated risks.
We believe ORI will have significant applications during surgical procedures, intubation and procedural sedation, among others, and can help clinicians improve patient outcomes by keeping patients in the optimal oxygenation zone to help reduce risk for both hypoxia and hyperoxia.
The advantages of the Bier block lie in the lack of sedating anesthesia, enabling a patient to be quickly treated and discharged with minimal allocation of resources, rather than that required for procedural sedation and certainly general anesthesia.
Under procedural sedation, the hip was reduced and found to be stable after being brought through a full range of motion.