Prodigy


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Prodigy

(networking)
A commercial on-line conferencing service, co-developed by IBM and Sears, Roebuck, Inc.

Prodigy's main competitors are AOL and Compuserve.

Prodigy

An earlier online information service that provided access to the Internet, e-mail and a variety of databases. Launched in 1988, Prodigy was the first consumer-oriented online service in the U.S. and one of the first to offer a graphics-based user interface (GUI) rather than text. The original service used proprietary software, but subsequent improvements produced an all-Internet service that used a Web browser. Founded as a partnership of IBM and Sears, Prodigy was acquired by International Wireless in 1996 and then by SBC Communications in 2001. In 2005, SBC merged with AT&T. See online service.
References in classic literature ?
A cry followed; he reeled, staggered, clutched at the table and held on, staring with injected eyes, gasping with open mouth; and as I looked there came, I thought, a change--he seemed to swell-- his face became suddenly black and the features seemed to melt and alter--and the next moment, I had sprung to my feet and leaped back against the wall, my arms raised to shield me from that prodigy, my mind submerged in terror.
Fakirs and soldiers and priests, seized with instant terror, lay there, with their faces on the ground, not daring to lift their eyes and behold such a prodigy.
A superstitious old woman was the only witness of this prodigy.
The islanders at first gazed in mute admiration at so unusual a prodigy, and seemed inclined to regard it as some new divinity.
I have not seen him, But Rumour speaks of him as of a prodigy Pre-eminent in arts and arms, and wealth, And high descent.
Shut up there, at bay, defiant, and with the prodigy of the thing palpably proveably DONE, thus giving notice like some stark signboard - under that accession of accent the situation itself had turned; and Brydon at last remarkably made up his mind on what it had turned to.
This youth had been a prodigy at college, and European fame was promised him when he was barely fifteen; but when he appeared in the world he failed, first publicly as a dramatist and a demagogue, and then privately for years on end as an actor, a traveller, a commission agent or a journalist.
D'Artagnan, leaning against the wall, in front of Fouquet, with his hand to his brow, asked himself the cause of such a wonderful prodigy.
The presence of Natasha- a woman, a lady, and on horseback- raised the curiosity of the serfs to such a degree that many of them came up to her, stared her in the face, and unabashed by her presence made remarks about her as though she were some prodigy on show and not a human being able to hear or understand what was said about her.
I forget-- are you a prodigy, or did you say you were not a prodigy?
He must share the infant prodigy he had discovered.
He had lived life, and seen things, and performed that prodigy of prodigies, namely, the turning of his back upon his own people, and, in so far as it was possible for an Indian, becoming a white man even in his mental processes.