profane

(redirected from profaneness)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal.

profane

1. not designed or used for religious purposes; secular
2. not initiated into the inner mysteries or sacred rites

profane

see SACRED AND PROFANE.
References in periodicals archive ?
Collier, Jeremy A Short View of the Immorality and Profaneness of the English Stage.
Illustrative of an early "obscenity" law but with an ostensibly religious focus was Massachusetts's act "Against Immorality, Intemperance and Profaneness, and for Reformation of Manners," which criminalized publication of "any filthy, obscene, or prophane song, pamphlet, libel or mock-sermon [in] mimicking of preaching, or any other part of divine worship.
found every Day that some Arguments grew less acceptable to him, and that the constant Conversation with Men of great Profaneness, whose Wit consisted in abusing Scripture, and in repeating and acting what the Preachers said in their Sermons, and turning it into Ridicule (a Faculty in which the Duke of Buckingham excelled), did much lessen the natural Esteem and Reverence He had for the Clergy; and inclined him to consider them as a Rank of Men that compounded a Religion for their own Advantage, and to serve their own Turns.
We cannot expect otherwise to prevail against the ignorance, atheism, profaneness, superstition, idolatry, lust that reigns in the nation than by a prudent, sober, pious, virtuous education of our daughters.
77) Robinson undermined his Baptist opponent with the dismissive comments that Helwys "misinterprets words," "letteth loose his tongue into the most intemperate rage," "falls into one of his hot fits," "is utterly deceived," and "is guilty of gross ignorance and profaneness and contempt of the knowledge, judgment, zeal and graces of all other men.
Moreover, the desperate pleas for salvation are consistent with Otto's analysis of the numinous wherein, upon an encounter with divine presence and creaturely profaneness, there is the human hope of deliverance by "atonement" and "covering":
Thus, John Savage warned in 1704 that "a deluge of atheism and profaneness, of faction and sedition has flown in under the shelter of it" on account of "the liberty as now-a-days stretch'd beyond the design of the toleration, of every man's serving Cod in his own way.
At some point before the summer of 1629, Endicott "caused that maypole to be cut down, and rebuked" the remnant of Morton's men "for their profaneness and admonished them to look there should be better walking.
found in appeasing the clamour of the people against the supposed profaneness, of changing the saints' days in the Calendar, and altering the time of all the immoveable feasts.
In response to Jeremy Collier's attacks on Dryden's earlier profane plays, Dryden humbles himself, admitting the bishop "has tax'd me justly," retracting "all Thoughts and Expressions of mine, which can be truly argu'd of Obscenity, Profaneness, or Immorality," and concluding, "If he be my Enemy, let him triumph; if he be my Friend .
A 1975 document from the Congregation for the Sacraments and Divine Worship said that while liturgical dancing may be permissible in non-Western cultures, dancing in the West "is tied with love, with diversion, with profaneness, with unbridling of the senses.
1700), provided readers with a digest of the "Penal Laws against Profaneness and Vice," and forms for "warrants issued out in cases of Prophaneness and Debauchery.