proglacial

proglacial

[prō′glā·shəl]
(geology)
Of streams, deposits, and other features, being immediately in front of or just beyond the outer limits of a glacier or ice sheet, and formed by or derived from glacier ice.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Spencer was forced to resign in 1887: he devoted that summer to intensive fieldwork in the Great Lakes region, tracing proglacial lake beaches.
Apparently the coarser sands were carried into a proglacial lake or pond which covered the Heisler locality during periods of melting; these formed the sandy bands.
This is a few metres above the highest water level of proglacial lakes at the Siimusti-Kaiu icemarginal stage (13 800-13 600 yr BP; Rosentau et al.
Changes in tree growth at high elevations and changes in sediment delivery to proglacial lakes have also been used to infer climate and glacier fluctuations during the Holocene (Leonard, 1997; Luckman, 2000).
Such a sequence has been interpreted to be caused by ice overriding, grounding, and then incorporating proglacial lake sediments of an ancestral Lake Erie (R.
Palaeogeographic reconstructions show that the Pandivere Upland and its vicinity became free of local proglacial lakes (turned into dry land) 12 800 cal yr BP at the latest (Rosentau et al.
For most of his life, he worked on preglacial river valleys in Ontario, and the origin and extent of proglacial precursors of the Great Lakes.
The territory of Tallinn was free of ice by 13 000-12 800 cal yr BP, considering the ice recession chronology (Kalm 2006) and the age of proglacial lakes in Estonia (Saarse et al.
A notable example is in the southern parts of the Hudson and James Bay basins, where proglacial lake and seabed deposits have contributed to development of one of largest peatland complexes in the world.
However, the surficial part of the till is commonly reworked and washed by local proglacial lakes that existed at the end of deglaciation.