pronate


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pronate

[′prō‚nāt]
(anatomy)
To turn the forearm so that the palm of the hand is down or toward the back.
To turn the sole of the foot outward with the lateral margin of the foot elevated; to evert.
(control systems)
To orient a robot toward a position in which the back or protected side of a manipulator faces up and is exposed.
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, if a subject was trying to pronate his or her wrist and the hand closed, the subject needed to reopen the hand before achieving the target posture.
Therefore, Marshall learned how to pronate the release of every type of pitch, including his slider.
He is holding a slapstick and a mask in his left hand while extending his right hand in pronate position, as if displaying stigmata.
21) In this case, in order to treat the wrist extensor group, the clinician applies proximal tension distal to the lateral epicondyle while the patient extends the elbow and pronates and flexes the wrist.
As it turned out, I severely over pronate, which in laymans terms means I put more pressure on the inner side of my foot.
This Integrative Footwear collection is designed to be a fashion-meets-function shoe line that promotes normal knee function, minimizes interference with hip alignment, decreases pressure on the lower back, and neutralizes the unnatural surfaces that force your feet to pronate (roll over) to gain ground contact (which flattens the arches--ouch
For example, the hip abductors are commonly weak and can cause the entire leg to pronate at the knee, ankle, and foot.
By walking back and forth over a footpad connected to a computer, podiatrist Andrew James, who is also responsible for looking after the feet of the Wales rugby squad and Elite Cymru athletes, told me I over pronate, and offered up a selection of shoes which would help prevent injury and you can feel the difference.
Instead of supinating and flexing, simply place the thumb over the radial head, grab the wrist, and slowly pronate.
For example, if you are flat footed or you pronate ( in which the inner edge of the sole bears the body's weight ( you may develop knee and arch pain or shin splints.
The angle at which your sole lands has much to do with whether you excessively pronate or supinate.
THE EXPERT VIEW: Sports scientist and ex-Olympic cross-country runner Tony Bignell says, 'The vast majority of people tend to pronate to some extent while they run or walk.