protective device


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protective device

[prə′tek·tiv di′vīs]
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to the narrow protective devices in the Termitrab complete product range from Phoenix Contact which are just 3.
Alpine Canada, the governing body of alpine ski competition in Canada, does not currently have a rule mandating back protection, and rather follows FIS guidelines on allowing spinal protective device use in competition as stated in its rules of competition.
Capacitance can also be an issue, because the capacitance of many solid-state protective devices is not only substantial, but varies with varying voltage levels, which can generate all sorts of distortion.
The single-line diagram begins at the point of the utility service connection and shows each piece of equipment and its overcurrent protective devices, cable sizes and numbers per phase, conduit types and sizes, fuses, transformer sizes and impedances, circuit breakers and their trip units and other details.
Branch circuit protective devices typically fall into two categories, molded-case circuit breakers listed to UL489 or fuses listed to UL248.
Qinetiq is working closely with the Eurofighter Typhoon Integrated Project Team to design a protective device that will ensure the Typhoon fighter aircraft is not damaged by the high Electro-Magnetic Pulse (EMP) that results from the detonation of nuclear device.
Teach the athlete to respect the helmet as a protective device and not to use it as a weapon.
Many companies explicitly require or permit net settlement in their purchase and sales contracts as a matter of course, expecting that these terms would be used infrequently, but serving as a protective device in unusual circumstances.
The protective device in the motor control center did not trip, nor did it trip the upstream feeder circuit beaker that supplied this MCC via an automatic transfer switch (ATS).
North has patents on three inventions: the Lightweight Ballistic Protective Device (a bulletproof vest), the Removable Ballistic Resistant Armor Seat Cover and Floor Mat, and the Ballistic Shield (demonstrated, in the patent application illustration, by a ringer for George Bush).
OSHA studies show that when eye protection is used, most injuries occur because flying objects go around the protective device.
March 30, 1994), the court held that the pollution exclusion clause did not bar claims arising from lead exposure: "Here the failure to provide claimant with an appropriate protective device gives rise to exposure - covered by the policy and not excluded by the pollution exclusion clause.