psychoactive


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Related to psychoactive: psychoactive substance

psychoactive

capable of affecting mental activity
References in periodicals archive ?
Mental Health Minister Helen Morton said the emergence of new psychoactive substances and related harms had been an ongoing concern for the Western Australian Government, due to the serious health problems and harms associated with their use.
Ms Anderson said: "We are all aware of the misery caused by these psychoactive substances or so-called legal highs.
The legislation, which is going through Parliament, will introduce a blanket ban on the production, distribution, sale and supply of so-called designer drugs - officially known as new psychoactive substances (NPSs) - after they were linked to scores of deaths.
She said: "Novel psychoactive substances cause misery, especially to young people who, in large numbers, are encouraged to try them out by the fact that they are not against the law.
Public Health Wales says there is a "rising concern" about the misuse of new psychoactive substances.
The CEO of Angelus, Jan King, said, "The discussions around legal highs at the moment are bound to focus on the Psychoactive Substances Bill and the forthcoming legal changes on supply.
The Psychoactive Substances Billand will apply to "any substances intended for human consumption that is capable of producing a psychoactive effect".
A Home Office spokesperson said: "The Government is determined to clamp down on suppliers and traders of new psychoactive substances, or so called 'legal highs',' which have claimed the lives of far too many young people.
The minister is following the example of Ireland, which rid itself of the blight of legal highs by banning all psychoactive substances four years ago.
For all that, a campaign to encourage moderation in the use of a psychoactive drug is bizarre, an illustration of a society that has lost sight of moral absolutes.
They mimic but do not exactly replicate the structure of THC (tetrahydrocannabinol), the principal psychoactive constituent of cannabis.
According to Mr Nadelmann, the synthetic drug law of New Zealand known as the Psychoactive Substances Act was considered a "global breakthrough" in drug legislation.