psychological warfare


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psychological warfare

the military application of psychology, esp to propaganda and attempts to influence the morale of enemy and friendly groups in time of war
References in periodicals archive ?
The book is organized from the particular to the general, focusing first on Campbell's own experiences and on how he made his way into the psychological warfare program, and ending with a more comprehensive treatment of the material produced on both sides and an assessment of the effectiveness of the efforts.
As an Air Force lieutenant with the ARCS, Campbell became an expert in the production and distribution of military propaganda and psychological warfare via leaflets.
Such remarks fall within the framework of psychological warfare aimed at creating a negative perception about Iran's peaceful nuclear activities," Mehmanparast told state news IRNA.
Therefore, the revolutionary armed forces of the DPRK will launch an all-out military strike to blow up the group's means for the psychological warfare," it said.
Most of the Army's operational work in psywar took place at the theater level, where the responsible organization was normally designated a psychological warfare branch (PWB).
In psychological warfare, "you make your enemy convinced of something he is not convinced of.
Under the guidance of a president who believed firmly in the importance of psychological warfare, the Eisenhower administration adopted an approach that was far more sophisticated than its predecessors' and Osgood amply shows that propaganda assumed genuine importance in Eisenhower's strategy for fighting the Cold War.
But, in what is bound to be perceived in some quarters as psychological warfare timed to coincide with the crucial Christmas period, the Old Trafford boss insists they will drop points.
I think there is an element of psychological warfare about the choice of pitch, because several of their other qualifiers have been played on grass.
Portraying a husband and wife who are accomplished at the art of psychological warfare, Bill Irwin shouldn't be able to fight, while Kathleen Turner shouldn't have a teardrop's worth of tenderness.
Eighteen such psychological warfare operations from 1605 to modern times are described, along with close inspections of the 'blackout' of key questions the traditional and alternative media alike have failed to address.
Other documents obtained by the paper describe the "Zarqawi PSY-OP"--the latter a term for psychological warfare operations--as "the most successful information campaign to date.