psychosexual development


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Related to psychosexual development: Psychosocial development

psychosexual development

[¦sī·kō¦sek·chə·wəl di′vel·əp·mənt]
(psychology)
In psychoanalytic theory, a series of four developmental stages (oral, anal, phallic, and Oedipal), relatively fixed in time, that are determined by the interaction between a person's biological drives and the environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this way parents do not only expect, but also take an active part in, the psychosexual development of their children.
In their work on the influence of fatherly affirmation on the psychosexual development of young men, Naus & Theis (1994, 1995) found a relationship between a father's unconditional positive regard and such characteristics as self-esteem and comfort with masculinity.
Freud had previously suggested that children progress through several stages of what he called psychosexual development, including a period in which boys have to resolve an Oedipal complex marked by sexual desire for the mother and rivalrous hatred of the father.
This paper discusses psychosexual development in young children, noting that preschoolers are often puzzled by sexual anatomical differences, that children need names for sexual body parts, and that occasional masturbation is normal.
His papers on women's psychosexual development were few and far between.
Theories of psychosexual development have identified some universal psychological characteristics of the male adolescents, but it is the sociocultural context which supplies the guidelines and norms for their attitudes and behavior as well as their families.
For individuals who have been mentally ill since childhood or adolescence, normative psychosexual development may have been arrested so that they cannot maintain normal social and sexual relationships (Carmen & Brady, 1990).
In 1905 appeared his controversial study Drei Abhandlungen zur Sexualtheorie (Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality), in which he presented discoveries concerning infantile sexuality and in which he proposed several complicated stages of psychosexual development, including the formation of the Oedipus complex.
The Arrow of Gold and The Rover, as a result, fall into place as stories of psychosexual development and initiation.
Erikson, who trained as an analyst in Vienna with Sigmund and Anna Freud, is known for his interpretation and adaptation of Freud's stages of psychosexual development.