public key


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public key

An encryption key that can be made public or sent by ordinary means such as an email message. See private key for more details.
References in periodicals archive ?
banks rely on a type of public key system called RSA (named for Ron Rivest, Adi Shamir, and Leonard Adleman, its inventors) to provide users with private online account access.
The Diffie-Hellman key agreement mechanism is a well-understood and widely implemented public key technique that facilitates cost-effective cryptographic key agreement across modern distributed electronic networks such as the Internet.
The security of this type of cryptosystem rests on finding a mathematical procedure to generate two complementary keys such that knowing just the public key and the encryption method is not enough to deduce the private key.
Other security products offered are Triple-DES, security hashing, and public key accelerators.
Symmetric key cryptography is used to encrypt each packet instead of public key cryptography because it is considerably less computationally intensive.
In the RSA scheme, the secret key consists of two prime numbers that are multiplied together to create the lengthier public key.
Banking and health care industries have recognized the importance of mandatory, mutual public key authentication as a way to not only be secure and responsive to their customers, but to reap technical competitive advantages.
AirGuard's Security Server interoperates with the DoD Public Key Infrastructure by accepting certificates from the appropriate DoD Certificate Authority.
Market experience has shown that first-generation approaches to managing certificates in a Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) system are both costly and cumbersome.
Utilizing Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) and biometrics, the Veridicom Identity Server will ensure the authenticity of users, and guarantees the privacy and integrity of their data and transactions.
These innovations include real time public key retrieval, "transaction certificates," and sending encrypted messages using a non-SMTP protocol through a forwarding server.

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