puerperal fever


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puerperal fever

a serious, formerly widespread, form of blood poisoning caused by infection contracted during childbirth
References in periodicals archive ?
After months of doing research, poring over every minute detail that separated his clinic from that of the midwives', the answer finally revealed itself during the autopsy of his friend, Jakob Kolletschka, who had been accidentally stabbed with a scalpel by a medical student during a procedure and whose autopsy revealed that he'd died from a disease that was similar to puerperal fever.
For instance, paste of roots of Elephantopus scaber and Allium sativum cloves was administered for three consecutive days in the morning on an empty stomach as treatment for puerperal fever.
After giving birth to her fifth child, Muhammad Akbar, Dilras possibly suffered from puerperal fever, due to complications caused by the delivery and died a month after the birth of her son.
During this time in history, puerperal fever (post partum [PP] infection) or "childbed fever" boasted a death rate as high as 16% to 35%.
In our study, the incidence of puerperal fever among women who delivered at home was 3.
The attempt to understand puerperal fever in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries: the influence of inflammation theory.
Seven plants each were used for treatment of puerperal fever or liver dysfunctions, like jaundice.
In the era before germ theory, Semmelweis intuited that the unwashed hands of physicians were spreading puerperal fever in Vienna.
For six women with puerperal fever, the use of oral or injectable antibiotics meant that only two had to be referred.
In 1847, at the age of 28, the Viennese obstetrician Ignac Semmelweis famously deduced that by not washing hands, doctors were themselves to blame for childbed fever, also known as puerperal fever.
She reminded my mother that when she had had puerperal fever after giving birth to me, my former mother-in-law breast-fed me and that my marriage to her son was thus forbidden," she said.
Semmelweis went back 100 years to find out why there was such an increase in puerperal fever (childbed fever) that had killed thousands of mothers in obstetric units.