Pulpitis


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Related to Pulpitis: root canal, irreversible pulpitis

Pulpitis

 

an inflammation of the dental pulp caused by an infection usually resulting from advanced dental caries. Pulpitis may also be caused by a trauma (for example, fracture of a tooth crown near the pulp) or chemical irritation (acids, formaldehyde). Pulpitis generally develops as an acute process. The principal symptom is sharp intermittent pain that frequently irradiates along the branches of the trigeminal nerve; the pain may simulate disease of the adjacent teeth. When left untreated, pulpitis results in periodontitis.

Treatment involves the complete or partial removal of the pulp after it is devitalized or anesthetized. Pulpitis can sometimes be cured and the pulp preserved if the patient visits a dentist promptly. The final stage of treatment is filling the tooth.

References in periodicals archive ?
38) In a study of patients with irreversible pulpitis, there was no significant difference between 3.
26] Reversible pulpitis is manifested as transient pain in response to thermal stimuli.
The criteria for exclusion from the study included necrosis, pulpitis or tooth pain, mandibular orthodontic treatments, consumption of analgesics like Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) during the past two weeks, daily consumption of benzodiazepines during the past two weeks, pregnancy or breastfeeding, contraindications of chlordiazepoxide and oxazepam and consumption of drugs interfereing with chlordiazepoxide and oxazepam.
Using successful pulpal analgesia in teeth with irreversible pulpitis as an outcome measure, Brandt concluded that articaine produced successful analgesia 2.
suppurative pulpitis #3" as well as "moderate to diffuse marginal and papillary edema mandibular anteriors") synthesizes information from four separate areas that represent the subjective interpretation and the objective data as described above, along with the implications of goals and treatment.
Comparison of anesthetic efficacy of 4% articaine and 2% lidocaine for maxillary buccal infiltration in patients with irreversible pulpitis.
Obviously the success of the procedure also depends on the correct diagnosis of reversible pulpitis or accidental exposure of the pulp.
3] 57 children (30 M and 27 F, with a mean age of 8 years, range 511 years), a total of 66 pairs of restorations were placed; Inclusion criterion: at least 2 proximal carious lesions in primary molars with an expected exfoliation time exceeding 2 years; Exclusion criteria: availability for recall was uncertain, uncooperative, serious health problems, no parental consent; children were treated at their regular appointments and no extra time was reserved for participation in the study; all teeth were vital with no sign of pulpitis.
In the 2 months prior to reporting, pain was mainly attributed to: root remnants, fistula and pulpitis.
Whilst the authors readily report that neuropathic orofacial pain is rare in our paediatric patients, this paper provides a useful reference and might assist in cases where pulpitis and periodontitis have been ruled out.
A pulpotomy is usually performed for carious exposures of primary teeth with normal pulp or reversible coronal pulpitis, or primary teeth pulpally exposed by trauma.