pumice stone


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pumice stone

[′pəm·əs ‚stōn]
(geology)

pumice stone

A solid block of pumice; used to polish or rub painted or varnished surfaces.
References in periodicals archive ?
As a clinician working with patients of leprosy for nearly two decades, we have some reservations about the suggestion of the use of a pumice stone, or any other rough surface for the self-care of anaesthetic feet.
Robles Casolco said the use of volcanic ash instead of pumice stone could cut the cost of production of blue jeans in half, which in turn would reduce the cost of the final apparel.
Brush dry feet with a pumice stone to get rid of dead skin and calluses.
The material was pumice stone, used in washing denim, and had been stored on the site by another company, S & S Environmental Processing.
Hard skin can be treated by soaking feet in warm salty water and rubbing the area gently with a pumice stone.
Soak the foot in warm water and then pare the corn with a pumice stone.
Just rub gently with a pumice stone after a shower or bath, then massage in a layer of foot cream.
Use a pumice stone or foot files (similar to nail files, only larger) to prevent corns and calluses from building up.
Researchers instructed the patients to apply duct tape to the affected area for six days, remove the tape, soak the area in water, rub the wart with an emery board or pumice stone, and apply new tape after 12 hours.
The dead skin covering the verruca must first be removed using a pumice stone or emery board, following which the treatment from the chemist should work.