purdah


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purdah

, purda
1. the custom in some Muslim and Hindu communities of keeping women in seclusion, with clothing that conceals them completely when they go out
2. a screen in a Hindu house used to keep the women out of view
3. a veil worn by Hindu women of high caste
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References in periodicals archive ?
2067 which means that normal purdah is preferred by majority.
THE Supreme Court on Friday dismissed petitions filed by two Muslim girls and the Students Islamic Organisation of India, an NGO, against a CBSE circular which prohibited students from wearing headscarf and purdah noting that faith is something different from wearing a particular kind of cloth.
After introducing theoretical issues in the historiography of this period, she traces Hindu women's participation in the nationalist movement and the response of police and other men to those who believed that a free India meant freeing women from traditional purdah (segregation) and linking women's education with nation-building.
Cllr Jones tweeted yesterday: "Welcome @ wrexhamcbc commitment to urgent investigation into Communities First alleged breach of purdah in respect of pro Labour newsletter.
Julia Magill, Cardiff's cabinet member for education said purdah would not "compromise delivery" of the new provision and the proposals "ought to be deliverable on the timescale we've given.
Addressing the Friday congregation at Mansoora mosque, he said that the well to do families had been constrained to queue for one time meal and Purdah observing ladies were lying in the open awaiting help and relief.
They are poor working people (sewing for some of the little tailor shops) and are not purdah women.
Its common excuse it that they are largely averse to living in refugee camps because of their women's purdah.
The Bishop of Willesden, the Rt Rev Pete Broadbent, tweeted at York University: "About to go into Twitter purdah while we have synod discussion groups with facilitators.
With her knowledge of the language, Doreen Ingrams was able to get to know the women who lived in Purdah.
For example, what Najmi (2004) has asserted in her article referred to above is that purdah is an obligation, but in those situations mentioned by her, it ought not to be strictly observed.
Purdah in various forms was found at least as early as sixth-century B.

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