purgatory


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purgatory

(pûrg`ətôr'ē) [Lat.,=place of purging], in the teaching of the Roman Catholic Church, the state after death in which the soul destined for heaven is purified. Since only the perfect can enjoy the vision of God (inferred from Mat. 12.36; Rev. 21.17), and some die in grace who have still unpunished or unrepented minor sins on their conscience, they must be purged of such sins. Those who have suffered already (especially the martyrs) may have undergone much or all of their punishment. Souls in purgatory are members of the church along with the living and the blessed in heaven and may be helped, as in life, by the prayers and works of their fellow members. This unity is the communion of saints. Prayers for the dead are therefore commonplace in Roman Catholic life; one form is the requiemrequiem
[Lat.,=rest], proper Mass for the souls of the dead, performed on All Souls' Day and at funerals. The reformation of Roman Catholic liturgy following the Second Vatican Council (see Vatican Council, Second) has modified the traditional requiem, and it is now called the
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 Mass (see also indulgenceindulgence,
in the Roman Catholic Church, the pardon of temporal punishment due for sin. It is to be distinguished from absolution and the forgiveness of guilt. The church grants indulgences out of the Treasury of Merit won for the church by Christ and the saints.
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). The duration of time and the nature of the state of purgatory are not defined; the suffering is different in kind from that of hellhell,
in Western monotheistic religions, eternal abode of souls damned by the judgment of God. The souls in hell are deprived forever of the sight of God. The punishment of hell is generally analogized to earthly fire.
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, for the soul in purgatory knows that his punishment is temporary. The ancient Jews prayed for the dead (2 Mac. 12.43–46), and the Christians continued the practice, holding the concomitant belief in a middle state between life and heaven. The Eastern Orthodox Church maintains this position without adopting the Western terms developed in the Middle Ages. Protestants have generally abandoned it.
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Purgatory, in accordance with Catholic teaching, is a temporary place or condition of punishment for those who, upon death, are not entirely free from venial sin. Fortean Picture Library.

Purgatory

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

The Roman Catholic doctrine of purgatory (from the Latin word purgare, meaning "to make clean or purify") affirms that there is "a place or condition of temporal punishment for those who, departing this life in God's grace, are not entirely free from venial faults, or have not fully paid the satisfaction due to their transgressions."

"Venial faults" are those sins of human frailty that are not as serious as the more damning sins, such as murder, but still serve to render the person less than pure before God. Unrepented venial faults still need to be dealt with. That is the purpose of purgatory.

Purgatory exists as a way-station on the path to heaven. Prayers of the faithful on Earth help lessen the time spent there, and indulgences, or forgiveness, can still be granted by the pope. But the doctrine points out the Catholic view of the seriousness of sin and the purity of God. Even though sin is atoned for by Christ, the results of that sin carry over into actions and attitudes, and these must be dealt with.

The official Church doctrine lists page after page of arguments from the Bible and tradition, but points out that the sixteenth-century Protestant reformers decided that purgatory did not exist. It was a figment of Catholic imagination. As such, it is a doctrine unique to Catholicism.

Purgatory

 

according to Catholic dogma, a place where the souls of dead sinners can be cleansed of sins committed in life. The cleansing is supposedly accomplished through the sinner’s enduring various trials; it is also accomplished through the prayers and good works of the relatives of the deceased, primarily through their monetary contributions to the church. The doctrine of purgatory was adopted by the Council of Florence (1438–45) and was confirmed in 1562 by the Council of Trent.

purgatory

Chiefly RC Church a state or place in which the souls of those who have died in a state of grace are believed to undergo a limited amount of suffering to expiate their venial sins and become purified of the remaining effects of mortal sin
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, the existence of purgatory so that the souls may be cleansed from sins to be able to enter heaven.
It will be Purgatory, and while Purgatory is painful, it is finite.
Purgatory Road by Samuel Parker tells the story of several people lost in the desert.
So what can it mean for this exhibit--the first to fill the National Museum of African Art's entire floor space, in which viewers literally descend from the exhibit's heaven to purgatory to hell sections--to suggest that those concepts laid out in Dante don't belong to the Catholic church?
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One day there was a fire in the chapel and, when it had been extinguished, "the image of the suffering face of what appeared to be a soul in Purgatory was left behind.
Vadellis encouraged the faithful to pray the Lord's Prayer, the Hail Mary, and the Glory Be for the intentions of the Pope in order to receive a plenary indulgence for souls in purgatory.
So the richly rewarding experience of reading Purgatory is to induce a small scale purgatory in the readers--we do not know who the murderer is, and we do not know how long the victims will lie in their burial ground until dug up.
In the freshman season finale, Ichabod had left Abbie behind in the purgatory, promising that he will come back for her.
Though Purgatory has no real foundation in scripture, it has been a major part of Catholic tradition for centuries.
11) Newman's hybrid form also allowed him to use poetic methods to accomplish ideological ends: only by crafting a "poetics of conciliation" could he successfully perform, and not simply describe, the theological conundrums at the heart of his conception of purgatory as a place for gradual change.
The depiction of mystical ascent by the anonymous 14th-century author of the classic The Cloud of Unknowing provides, in my view, an analogy for understanding postmortem purgation, purgatory.