Purism


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purism

insistence on traditional canons of correctness of form or purity of style or content, esp in language, art, or music

Purism

 

a movement in French painting in the second and third decades of the 20th century. The founders and chief proponents of purism were A. Ozenfant and C. E. Jeanneret (Le Corbusier). The purists protested against what they considered to be the merely decorative tendencies of cubism, which was marked by deliberate distortion. They sought to clearly render “stable” objective forms and to represent “primary” elements, which could be apprehended with minimum effort. Purist works were marked by emphatic two-dimensionality and the flowing rhythm of semitransparent silhouettes and outlines of objects (intentionally of one type—carafes, tumblers, and similar items). Purism failed to develop in painting, but, after undergoing a substantial number of theoretical revisions, found application in modern architecture, particularly in the designs of Le Corbusier.

REFERENCES

Modernizm (collection of articles). Moscow, 1973.
Jeanneret, C. E., and A. Ozenfant. Après le cubisme. Paris, 1918.

Purism

 

efforts to purify a literary language of foreign borrowings and neologisms and to prevent its penetration by non-normative lexical and grammatical elements, including colloquialisms, popular speech, and dialectisms.

Purism is characteristic of a period in which the norms of a national literary language are becoming established and its stylistic system is changing. Such periods, marked by an influx of new lexical elements and their stylistic redistribution, are generally associated with political and cultural movements; this has been the case in Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Turkey, India, and elsewhere. Purists have sometimes insisted that if a national language is to be distinctive, it must be completely purged of even essential borrowings: that is, words of foreign origin already part of the language must be replaced by native words or by neologisms composed from native morphemes.

In Russian democratic literary criticism of the 19th century, represented by such writers as V. G. Belinskii, the term “purism” denoted a formal, conservative attitude toward language; the chief proponents of this view were A. S. Shishkov, F. V. Bul-garin, N. I. Grech, and M. P. Pogodin.

REFERENCES

Vinokur, G. O. “O purizme.” In his book O kul’ture iazyka, 2nd ed.
Moscow, 1929. Vinokur, G. O. Russkii iazyk. Moscow, 1945.

T. V. VENTTSEL

References in periodicals archive ?
Cahn's works, for example, indicate her proximity to Leger's simplification of objects and to Ozenfant's purism.
While language purists may take issue with the inclusion of new symbols in Ndebele orthography to represent the inter-dental fricatives, it may be unfair to the language and its speakers to sacrifice practicality on the altar of language purism.
They present two radically different approaches: Mott's purism on the one hand, Stanton and Anthony's pragmatism on the other.
With a formal language that is clear, striking and pared-down, it embodies the perfect balance between purism and sheer class.
In a way, his interdisciplinary approach complicates the strain of film purism that Sharits often adopts in his writing, where he focuses on the need to elucidate film's basic structures rather than using film to create an effect or a story.
They are said to demonstrate the brand's commitment to 'passion, performance, purism and precision.
The idea that news programs can carve out exceptions to these trends is appealing to purism, certainly, but by any objective measurethey're swimming against the tide.
He notes failures of deregulation and market purism (such as the Exon Valdez incident and the Enron scandal), points to various environmental injustices, and presents some results of studies on the foundation of trust and cooperation.
One has the impression that his sudden conversion to modernist aesthetics did not allow him time to digest the wide range of references that composed the lexicon of Purism and other aesthetic movements in Europe.
Of course, such a theory has tremendous pull for many political positions, including all kinds of racism and ethnic and cultural purism.
In continental Europe, the governments that opted for purism had to correct the resulting ineffectiveness and adopt what is known as "rationalized parliamentary government" to increase the means of action available to the government.