pursuit


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pursuit

1. an occupation, hobby, or pastime
2. (in cycling) a race in which the riders set off at intervals along the track and attempt to overtake each other

Pursuit

 

a type of military action whose objective is to destroy or capture an enemy who has begun a forced retreat or a deliberate withdrawal of troops to new lines.

Pursuit is organized when there is detection of an enemy withdrawal resulting from a successful breakthrough of enemy defenses, the defeat of the enemy in a meeting engagement, or a successfully developing counterstrike. The pursuit is carried on without stopping, either by day or by night. It follows in the path of the enemy’s withdrawal or travels in parallel directions for the purpose of overtaking the main forces, cutting off retreat routes, encircling the enemy, and destroying or capturing him. Troops pursue in combat, approach march, or march formations. Tank forces are used to reach deep points on the path of enemy withdrawal and take important lines where the enemy could organize resistance; airborne landings may also be used in such cases. If the retreating enemy goes over to the defensive, pursuing forces attack on the run. During pursuit, special attention is given to the fight against approaching enemy reserves.

References in classic literature ?
In another second I was running, one of a tumultuous shouting crowd, in pursuit of the escaping Leopard-man.
The Mexicans are continually on the alert, to intercept these marauders; but the Indians are apt to outwit them, and force them to make long and wild expeditions in pursuit of their stolen horses.
They were one of the few families then resident in the colonies who thought it a degradation to its members to descend to the pursuits of commerce; and who never emerged from the privacy of domestic life unless to preside in the councils of the colony or to bear arms in her defense.
None were keener in pursuit of this kind of game than M'Dougal and David Stuart; the latter was reminded of aquatic sports on the coast of Labrador, and his hunting exploits in the Northwest.
A tremendous howl was heard from the Arabs, but, completely engrossed by the pursuit, they had not taken notice of the balloon, which was now but five hundred paces behind them, and only about thirty feet from the ground.
It appears that, after having tasted astrology, philosophy, architecture, hermetics,--all vanities, he returned to tragedy, vainest pursuit of all.
Behind me no sign of pursuit developed, before me I saw no living thing.
When he had rested and bound up his wounded leg he started on in pursuit of the drifting canoe.
It was the hideous Number Three in mad pursuit of a female ourang outang, and an instant later he saw Number Twelve and Number Ten in battle with two males, while beyond he heard the voice of a man shouting encouragement to some one as he dashed through the jungle.
In the same degree as Cornelius de Witt had excited the hatred of the people by sowing those evil seeds which are called political passions, Van Baerle had gained the affections of his fellow citizens by completely shunning the pursuit of politics, absorbed as he was in the peaceful pursuit of cultivating tulips.
He ordered them to continue hoeing weeds in a distant and out-of-the-way corner, and went on with the pursuit of Tudor.
On returning to his native land, he still continued to turn his chemical knowledge to account, by giving his services to that particular branch of our commercial industry which is commonly described as the adulteration of commodities; and from this he had gradually risen to the more refined pursuit of adulterating gold and silver--or, to use the common phrase again, making bad money.