pylon


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pylon

1. a large vertical steel tower-like structure supporting high-tension electrical cables
2. a post or tower for guiding pilots or marking a turning point in a race
3. a streamlined aircraft structure for attaching an engine pod, external fuel tank, etc., to the main body of the aircraft
4. a monumental gateway, such as one at the entrance to an ancient Egyptian temple
5. a temporary artificial leg

Pylon

 

(1) A rectangular, truncated, pyramidal tower. In ancient Egyptian architecture, pylons flanked the narrow entrance of a temple. Such structures have been known since the Middle Kingdom, roughly from 2050 to 1700 B.C.

(2) A heavy pier used to support flat or arched roofs (for example, the roofs of subway stations).

(3) A massive low pier used to flank the entrance way to a palace terrace or park. Such pylons were widely used in classical architecture.

pylon

[′pī‚län]
(aerospace engineering)
A suspension device externally installed under the wing or fuselage of an aircraft; it is aerodynamically designed to fit the configuration of specific aircraft, thereby creating an insignificant amount of drag; it includes means of attaching to accommodate fuel tanks, bombs, rockets, torpedoes, rocket motors, or the like.
(civil engineering)
A massive structure, such as a truncated pyramid, on either side of an entrance.
A tower supporting a wire over a long span.
A tower or other structure marking a route for an airplane.

pylon

pylon, 1
1. Monumental gateway to an Egyptian temple, consisting of a pair of tower structures with slanting walls flanking the entrance portal.
2. In modern usage, a tower-like structure, as the steel supports for electrical high-tension

pylon

pylonclick for a larger image
An underwing pylon for use on combat aircraft.
i. The structure that holds a pod or an engine nacelle to the wing or fuselage.
ii. Towerlike structures that make turning points in an air race or ground reference maneuver.
References in periodicals archive ?
That tower is the tallest of the bridge's pylons at 125m high - slightly shorter than the 138m Radio City Tower.
In the North-West Maria is just as frustrated and worried by the pylons planned as close as 50 metres from her home in Ballaghadereen, Co Roscommon.
ReThink Pylons has come up with an alternative plan that costs just a 10th of Eirgrid's [euro]3billion project.
A 400,000-volt power line carried by 50-metre high pylons will then link the hub to the National Grid in Shropshire.
POWER TOWER Z SSE director Ian Funnell at the new pylon yesterday
The company's Wichita facility is responsible for the design and manufacturing of the pylon and underwing structure used to mount the aircraft's power plant to the wing.
The pylon has already sailed from Turkey on April 4 and would be arriving in Umm Qasr early next week," Ziad Ali Fadel told Aswat al-Iraq news agency.
It was reported that housewives living near the ground feared a pylon might fall onto their homes - especially with news that one of Bradford Park Avenue's floodlights had also crashed down.
One of the night's tasks was to install a station-8 SUU-79 pylon on aircraft 102--an easy task we'd done numerous times.
A woman yesterday survived falling from an electricity pylon, the ambulance service said.
Sliding the hydraulic deck pylon door forward on your Black Hawk was a no-brainer for a long time.