pylon


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pylon

1. a large vertical steel tower-like structure supporting high-tension electrical cables
2. a post or tower for guiding pilots or marking a turning point in a race
3. a streamlined aircraft structure for attaching an engine pod, external fuel tank, etc., to the main body of the aircraft
4. a monumental gateway, such as one at the entrance to an ancient Egyptian temple
5. a temporary artificial leg

Pylon

 

(1) A rectangular, truncated, pyramidal tower. In ancient Egyptian architecture, pylons flanked the narrow entrance of a temple. Such structures have been known since the Middle Kingdom, roughly from 2050 to 1700 B.C.

(2) A heavy pier used to support flat or arched roofs (for example, the roofs of subway stations).

(3) A massive low pier used to flank the entrance way to a palace terrace or park. Such pylons were widely used in classical architecture.

pylon

[′pī‚län]
(aerospace engineering)
A suspension device externally installed under the wing or fuselage of an aircraft; it is aerodynamically designed to fit the configuration of specific aircraft, thereby creating an insignificant amount of drag; it includes means of attaching to accommodate fuel tanks, bombs, rockets, torpedoes, rocket motors, or the like.
(civil engineering)
A massive structure, such as a truncated pyramid, on either side of an entrance.
A tower supporting a wire over a long span.
A tower or other structure marking a route for an airplane.

pylon

pylon, 1
1. Monumental gateway to an Egyptian temple, consisting of a pair of tower structures with slanting walls flanking the entrance portal.
2. In modern usage, a tower-like structure, as the steel supports for electrical high-tension

pylon

pylonclick for a larger image
An underwing pylon for use on combat aircraft.
i. The structure that holds a pod or an engine nacelle to the wing or fuselage.
ii. Towerlike structures that make turning points in an air race or ground reference maneuver.
References in periodicals archive ?
The project will see hundreds of 60-metre pylons, as tall as Liberty Hall in Dublin, erected across rural areas and in almost every county from Donegal to Cork.
As each pylon foundation is completed, work will begin on the pylon shafts.
Paddy - dad to Abraham, five, Saoirse, four, and two-year-old Aine - came home in 2012 and was so concerned by the destruction it would cause the local environment that he helped set up antipylon campaign group ReThink Pylons.
Sarah said: "I'm proud of working for National Grid and when the opportunity arose to climb a pylon and for a very worthy cause I leapt at the chance.
The majority of electricity pylons are in place under a temporary right - known as a wayleave agreement - between the landowner and the electricity distributor.
This is available to landowners or occupiers who will have pylons on their land.
Campaigners claim the new pylons will spoil landscapes in mountainous areas.
Bombardier awarded a contract to Spirit AeroSystems in 2009 to design and build pylons for both the CS100 and CS300 aircraft models.
The defendants allegedly exploded a gas cylinder next to the pylon, resulting in power cuts across East Riffa and Sanad.
BASRA / Aswat al-Iraq: The first power-generation pylon will arrives in the port of Umm Qasr next week, according to the chairman of the provincial council's electricity committee on Friday.
Indeed, they were so worried about the Canker Lane pylon that they dared not go too near