pyramidal roof

pyramidal roof

A hipped roof that usually has four or six sloping surfaces, terminating in a peak.
References in periodicals archive ?
Removal of existing glazed pyramidal roof and replace with minimal pitch roof.
The Tuckahoe marble facade and copper pyramidal roof of the Home Life Insurance Company Building across Broadway from City Hall Park were much in need of repair, when an inspection project by Swanke Hayden Connell Architects grew into a restoration.
The project as designed includes a three-storey central core with a pyramidal roof, and two two-storey wings.
You can't fail to be impressed by the ivy-covered facade of this building - with its many arched windows and pyramidal roof, it really does inspire feelings of grandeur and as you make your way up the drive you feel as if you've been transported to another era.
Pyramidal roof of wood is not only thermal efficient, damp and leakage proof but also economical as compared to conventional roofing, he told elaborating the features of the low cost houses.
The codes specified footprint and silhouette, limiting the house to a 9x9m plot and stipulating a regular pyramidal roof.
With reference to a contemporary photograph of the house in elevation, in which the perspective flattens the pyramidal roof form compressing its exposed, diagonal plywood boxed beams to read as deep horizontal fascias, Musgrave even re-casts (the image of) the house as a horizontally expressed 'pavilion of late modernity'.
It was like a huge and squat sentry-box: tall, square, two-storeyed, with a pyramidal roof of corrugated iron.
Situated on Shanghai's Bund overlooking the Huangpu River, it was built in the gothic style of the Chicago School of architecture with a number of distinguishing features, including granite facing on most of the building and a copper-sheathed pyramidal roof with steep sides and a height of about 10 meters.
With its singular pyramidal roof, 14 Wall Street is widely recognized as one of the great towers that define the skyline of lower Manhattan.
Dating from around 1774, the church's distinctive pyramidal roof indicates that it was built by the raskoIniki, or Old Believers who, following an Orthodox schism, fled north and established churches away from the Patriarch's authority in Moscow.