pyrite

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pyrite

(pī`rīt) or

iron pyrites

(pīrī`tēz, pə–, pī`rīts), pale brass-yellow mineral, the bisulfide of iron, FeS2. It occurs most commonly in crystals (belonging to the isometric system and usually in the form of cubes and pyritohedrons) but is also found in massive, granular, and stalactite form. In spite of its nickname, "fool's gold," it often is associated with true gold; auriferous pyrite is a commercially important source of gold. Other metals that sometimes replace a part of the iron are cobalt, nickel, arsenic, and copper. The most common sulfide mineral, pyrite is widely distributed in rocks of all ages and types. Its chief use is as a source of sulfur in the manufacture of sulfuric acid. The term pyrites is applied to any of a number of metallic sulfides that strike fire with steel. Some minerals resembling pyrite in appearance or composition are arsenopyritearsenopyrite
or mispickel
, silver-white to steel-gray mineral with the metallic luster characteristic of a pyrite. It is a sulfarsenide of iron, FeAsS, crystallizing in the orthorhombic system and occurring also in massive form.
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, chalcopyritechalcopyrite
or copper pyrites
, brass-yellow mineral, sometimes with an iridescent tarnish. It is a sulfide of copper and iron, CuFeS2 . It crystallizes in the tetragonal system but is usually found in the massive form.
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 (copper pyrites), cobaltitecobaltite
, opaque, silver-white, sometimes reddish or grayish mineral of the pyrite group, a compound of cobalt, arsenic, and sulfur, CoAsS. It occurs in crystals of the cubic system, also in compact to granular masses.
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, marcasitemarcasite
or white iron pyrites,
a mineral closely resembling and having the same chemical composition (FeS2) as pyrite. It differs from pyrite in that it is paler in color, becomes darker upon oxidation, and crystallizes in the orthorhombic system.
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 (white iron pyrites or spear pyrites), and pyrrhotitepyrrhotite
or magnetic pyrites,
bronze-yellow to bronze-red mineral, a sulfide of iron sometimes containing nickel. It tarnishes easily and is somewhat magnetic.
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 (magnetic pyrites).

Pyrite

 

(also iron pyrite), a mineral with the chemical composition FeS2, containing 46.6 percent iron and 53.4 percent sulfur. Admixtures of Co, Ni, As, Cu, Au, and Se are common. The crystal structure is of the NaCl type, in which Fe occupies the position of Na, and the dumbbell-like S22- pair, that of CI. Pyrite crystallizes in the isometric system, forming cubic, pyri-tohedral, and, less often, octahedral crystals. Most often it is massive or granular. It has a pale brass-yellow color and a metallic luster. Its hardness on Mohs’ scale is 6–6.5, and the density ranges from 4,900 to 5,200 kg/m3.

Pyrite is most widely distributed in hydrothermal deposits and in pyrite veins, in which large amounts of the mineral are concentrated. It serves as the raw material for the production of sulfuric acid, sulfur, and copperas (ferrous sulfate). Pyrite deposits in the USSR are found in the Ural Mountains (Degtiarka and Kalata deposits), the Altai, Kazakhstan, and Transcaucasia. Deposits are also found in Norway, Spain (Rio Tinto), Italy, Cyprus, USA, Canada, and Japan.

pyrite

[′pī‚rīt]
(mineralogy)
FeS2 A hard, brittle, brass-yellow mineral with metallic luster, crystallizing in the isometric system; hardness is 6-6.5 on Mohs scale, and specific gravity is 5.02. Also known as common pyrite; fool's gold; iron pyrites; mundic.

pyrite

a yellow mineral, found in igneous and metamorphic rocks and in veins. It is a source of sulphur and is used in the manufacture of sulphuric acid. Composition: iron sulphide. Formula: FeS2. Crystal structure: cubic
References in periodicals archive ?
The relative amounts of the 2 anions are also reported, as these can be used to infer the oxidation status of pyritic materials.
The effect of leaching the asphaltite samples with aqueous caustic on the removal of pyritic and organic sulfur, ash and volatile matter was discussed considering NaOH concentration, leaching time and temperature.
The soil layers overlying the pyritic gels were composed of medium- to fine-textured soil materials, often with yellow jarosite infillings in the soil matrix and root holes above the sulfide layer, and red/orange iron oxide/hydroxide segregations within the soil matrix and on the soil structural surfaces.
Traces of AVS indicative of monosulfides and pyritic sulfur were present in the silty-clay sediments deposited by floodwaters on the banks of the Richmond River (Fig.
in ashes, that of pyritic sulphur decreased from 0.
A variety of waste materials such as bauxite refinery residues, SWAN-gypsum, and sewage sludge have also recently been used to treat ASS and other pyritic materials (Loomis and Hood 1984; Offiah and Fanning 1994; McConchie and Clark 1996; McConchie et al.
To date the drilling is limited to the western edge of a very large IP response and the results are consistent with mineralization expected to occur within the pyritic shell on the periphery of such a system.
1966, 1978), but the practical results are not always entirely satisfactory for pyritic mine wastes that continually produce acid.
Apollo geologists believe potential targets at Huizopa include epithermal quartz-adularia veins containing high-grade "black pyritic breccia" gold-silver mineralization, as well as stockwork mineralization within sheeted-fracture zones in the hanging walls.
The recently completed, most southerly drill line in this area intersected multiple pyritic quartz veins (assays pending).
Results have now been received for a sample of this mineralization, which occurs in a silicified, quartz veined and pyritic mineralized section of a monzonite intrusive.
0 meters within a broad zone of strongly pyritic mineralization which averages 3.