quantum anomaly

quantum anomaly

[‚kwän·təm ə′näm·ə·lē]
(quantum mechanics)
A phenomenon whereby a quantity that vanishes according to the dynamical rules of classical physics acquires a finite value when quantum rules are used.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Now however, a new type of materials, the so-called Weyl semimetals, similar to 3-D graphene, allow us to put the symmetry destructing quantum anomaly to work in everyday phenomena, such as the creation of electric current.
However, a quantum anomaly can destroy their peaceful coexistence and changes a left-handed particle into a right-handed one or vice-versa.
Appearing in a paper published today in Nature, an international team of physicists, material scientists and string theoreticians, have observed such a material, an effect of a most exotic quantum anomaly that hitherto was thought to be triggered only by the curvature of space-time as described by Einstein's theory of relativity.