quercetin


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

quercetin

[′kwer·sə·tən]
(biochemistry)
C15H5O2(OH)5 A yellow, crystalline flavonol obtained from oak bark and Douglas-fir bark; used as an antioxidant and absorber of ultraviolet rays, and in rubber, plastics, and vegetable oils.
References in periodicals archive ?
Recently, several studies have shown the antidepressant activity of quercetin (Holzmann et al.
After the addition of 1/4 teaspoon daily of the "caged" quercetin to the treatment regimen, the patient went 19 days without requiring transfusion, more than twice as long as previously.
In samples to which sugars were added, the highest anthocyanin content samples contained catechin, quercetin and gallic acid.
At the end of the trial, women who received quercetin had less early morning stiffness, morning pain and pain after activity compared to pretreatment levels.
Purpose: We attempt to explore the molecular mechanisms involved in the neurohormetic responses to quercetin and rutin exposure, in a SH-SY5Y cell line which stably overexpresses the amyloid precursor protein (APP) Swedish mutation, based on a biphasic concentration-response relationship for cell viability.
You'll find quercetin in foods such as dark red and blue fruits, capers, and onions.
Studies in rats and pigs have shown that quercetin distributes to several tissues, particularly lung, kidney, colon, and liver, with lower levels in brain [7].
They examined the effect of the compounds produced after quercetin is broken down by the body.
63 min had similar UV absorption as quercetin (14), but protonated molecule was 162 Da heavier than quercetin.
group III: STZ + Qu40, rats in this group received quercetin in a daily dose of 80 mg/kg IP [18] for 12 consecutive days, followed by 1 week after induction of AD by ICV injection of STZ.