quinol


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quinol

[′kwi‚nȯl]
(organic chemistry)
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References in periodicals archive ?
However from our experiments, it is not possible to establish if trinexapac-ethyl accepts electrons from the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenases, or whether it simply acts as an inhibitor at quinone and quinol binding sites.
Our results further show that trinexapac-ethyl inhibition occurs at sites of quinol and quinone binding within the mitochondrial electron transport chain.
Quinol oxidation in Arum maculatum mitochondria and its application to the assay, solubilisation and partial purification of the alterative oxidase.
This enzyme, called quinol oxidase, or NOX, helps carry out several functions on the cell surface and is required for growth in both normal and cancerous cells.
The final quinol concentration was determined from the absorbance maximum at 290 nm.
In case of semiquinone, this will partly regenerate the initial quinol molecule via disproportionation:
Therefore, the thermodynamics of quinol oxidation in CL membranes awaits its investigators.
It is known to catalyze electron transfer from quinol to Cytochrome c and concomitantly translocates protons across the mitochondrial inner membrane to generate a proton gradient and membrane potential for ATP synthesis.
Huang, Observations Concerning the Quinol Oxidation Site of the Cytochrome BC1 Complex, FEBS Lett.
Xia, Crystallographic Studies of Quinol Oxidation Site Inhibitors: a Modified Classification of Inhibitors for the Cytochrome BC(1) Complex, J.
A few derivatives of benzothiazoles, especially quinol and 2-(4-aminophenyl) were found to be the most valuable anti-cancer agents both in vivo and in vitro systems [10-13].
Part 10: The synthesis and antitumour activity of benzothiazole substituted quinol derivatives , Bioorg.