Raddle

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Raddle

["On the Design of Large Distributed Systems", I.R. Forman, Proc 1st IEEE Intl Conf Comp Langs, pp.25-27 (Oct 1986)].
References in periodicals archive ?
withDubai's Emaar Properties, to develop community housing in the conflict raddled nation in the northern Arabian Gulf.
Physically, Elizabeth is raddled, wrinkled and outrageous; at one level here is a monarch whose thinking processes barely move beyond her own gratification; at another, she is aware of the need to protect the succession and she opposes the King of Scotland, James VI, son of a fierce political opponent--Mary Queen of Scots, whom she ordered to be beheaded.
Just because I couldn't quite comprehend something she said in that strange "youngster" language she uses, she shouted I was "past it"; a raddled old hag and a*** mother.
Officers from the UK's Child Exploitation Online Protection office had contacted police in Hong Kong to pass on intelligence about the raddled pervert.
The lank hair is that of a mad scientist, the streaky white make-up and extended red mouth the face of a raddled whore.
Ripped, smelted, sucked, blown from the raddled earth; turned into must-haves, always-wanteds, major advances, can't-do-withouts.
Which suggests they are either incredibly stupid, raddled out of their skulls or convinced that playing
Bjork doesn't emerge convincingly from the timbres of the strings for example, Richard Rodney Bennett simply doesn't sing very well, and on Randy Newman's Real Emotional Girl, Costello's raddled delivery is so like the composer's that it's uncomfortably like pastiche.
salt-miners raddled w/the xaala in their flesh & mind
In life her appearance is appalling, a raddled, rash-ridden, freckled, burnt, mottled, bleached and wizened piece of decaying matter.
Whether Walser is conjuring the precocious daughter of a Berlin art dealer or imagining the German writer Heinrich von Kleist on vacation, knocking off a mock job application or meditating on women's trousers, soaring in a balloon above the things that torment him or taking "a little ramble" through the splendidly ordinary mountains, the narrator is likely to sound "a little worn out, raddled, squashed, downtrodden" ("Nervous").