radio detection


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Related to radio detection: radio detection and ranging

radio detection

[′rād·ē·ō di′tek·shən]
(engineering)
The detection of the presence of an object by radiolocation without precise determination of its position.
References in periodicals archive ?
Magnetic retrieval facilitated reductions in personnel requirements, and techniques for radio detection and identification of tracers allow an audit to be conducted by one person in as little as 30 minutes.
By 1967, radio astronomy had taken advantage of new masers - or microwave amplification by stimulated emission of radiation devices - that operated at cryogenic temperatures to obviate thermal and other atmospheric noise in deep-space radio detection.
The system was called radio detection and ranging, abbreviated to ra.
The three basic components of the system include a radio detection unit (RDU), a leak detection unit (LDU), and a leak location unit (LLU).
One of the newest techniques for measuring high energy cosmic neutrinos regards their radio detection in natural salt mines.
Regular visual observations continue to be of great value and will always be needed to calibrate the levels of activity obtained by other means such as video recording and radio detection.
He said that the center uses three different methods of radar detection, electro-optic detection and radio detection to track and detect space objects.
The Nazis were confident that the squirts eluded radio detection because the transmission was completed before any known direction finder could start functioning.
The dictionary defines an acronym as a word formed from the initial letters of a name, or by combining initial letters or parts of a series of words, as radar for radio detection and ranging.
Tenders are invited for Utility locate service contract with a qualified company to field verify county water system water main and service line locations with radio detection and/or GPR equipment.
In addition to the large number of observers who monitored Draconid rates visually or successfully imaged members of the shower, many observers successfully recorded the outburst using radio detection techniques.
As the war progressed, Lorenzen, assigned to the lab's Special Developments Section, continued to expand on the idea of electronic countermeasures, or ECMs, developing radio detection and recording devices to defeat guided German missiles by analyzing the control signals sent to Henschel 293 flying bombs and using the information to disrupt or distort radio command signals.

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